src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1221358201701323&ev=PageView&noscript=1"


Media contact:
Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

Washington, DC (May 30, 2024): National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announced today that Michael V. Vitiello, PhD, has received its Lifetime Achievement Award. 

The Lifetime Achievement Award is the organization’s highest honor, recognizing an individual who has demonstrated exemplary leadership in the field of sleep health. The award celebrates the recipient’s connection to NSF’s non-profit, public health mission through their extensive professional contributions to the field and to the work of the organization.

“NSF is honored to present Dr. Vitiello with our Lifetime Achievement Award. His work as a researcher in sleep and circadian rhythms in older adults has been pivotal in the field,” said Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, Board Chair of the National Sleep Foundation.

Dr. Vitiello is Professor Emeritus, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, at the University of Washington, a Fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow (Health Sciences) of the Gerontological Society of America. He has previously served as Chair of the NIH’s Sleep Disorders Advisory Board (SDRAB), President of the Sleep Research Society (SRS), and Scientific Program Chair of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS). He has served on numerous committees and advisory boards, including serving on the Board of the National Sleep Foundation (2004-2009). He is also Editor-in-Chief of Sleep Medicine Reviews and has served as an editorial board member of numerous other scientific journals.

Dr. Vitiello was a member of numerous NSF Consensus Panels including NSF’s landmark 2015 Sleep Duration Guidelines, and 2016 Sleep Quality Recommendations as well as panels on Sleep Timing and Variability and NSF’s validated Sleep Satisfaction Tool. Dr. Vitiello currently chairs the National Sleep Foundation’s Population Health and Methodology Committee and recently was a panelist at the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep and Aging Conference. Dr. Vitiello has researched the science of sleep and aging for more than 40 years and is the author of 600+ scientific articles, reviews, chapters, editorials and abstracts, with his work being cited more than 35,000 times. 

Learn more about the National Sleep Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

Media contact:
Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Highlights the Effects of Screen Use on Children’s Sleep 

Behavioral strategies and interventions may reduce the negative effects of screen use on sleep health

Washington, D.C. (May 29, 2024): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) sounded a call for appropriate use of screens based on current evidence of their effect on sleep health in children and teens. The updated response follows a consensus report published in Sleep Health®, the Journal of the National Sleep Foundation, under the original title The Impact of Screen Use on Sleep Health Across the Lifespan: A National Sleep Foundation Consensus Statement.

The NSF advances the public’s knowledge, behaviors, and practices by issuing guidelines and recommendations for sleep health. NSF established a multidisciplinary expert panel of 16 internationally recognized researchers to develop a consensus recommendation for screen use and sleep health, reflecting an extensive analysis of 574 peer-reviewed manuscripts on the subject.

The expert panel found that, in general, screen use impairs sleep health for both children and adolescents. In particular, the content of screen use before bed can have a negative effect on sleep. Finally, the expert panel affirmed behavioral strategies and interventions can reduce the potentially negative effects of screen use on sleep health.

“NSF is dedicated to improving sleep health for the public. Understanding what can negatively affect sleep health in youth and how to promote sleep health can set children and teenagers up for positive sleep health that can carry into adulthood,” said Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, Chair of NSF’s Board of Directors.

“The expert panel examined available scientific evidence, paying close attention to studies that examined whether, how, and for whom screen use might negatively impact sleep health. We found that stimulating content of screen use, particularly at night, has a negative effect on sleep health in young people,” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD.

Screen use in youth is widespread. Best practices to reduce the impact of screens on sleep include:

NSF encourages parents and caregivers to make decisions about children’s screen use that work best for their family dynamic. Determining what constitutes appropriate screen use should be based on family-specific information. Generally, incorporating small changes into your family’s routine during the day and night can help everyone get the sleep they need to be their Best Slept Self®.

Not getting enough sleep, having poor sleep quality, or having inconsistent sleep schedules is associated with adverse health outcomes. For more information about sleep health, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

Learn more about screen use and ways to improve children’s sleep health.

Download Screen Use Infographic
Information on the Effects of Screen Use on Children’s Sleep

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 independent nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

Technology is a great tool to help keep us informed, connected, and entertained. These days, it sometimes feels like we have an electronic device permanently attached to our bodies given how often we spend time scrolling, searching, watching, playing, and posting. Unfortunately, there can be unwanted effects of electronic use: screen time, especially at night, can disrupt sleep in kids and teens.

The use of screens by children and adolescents can disrupt sleep.

Sleep is an essential process our brain and body use to recharge and recover, this is especially true for children and teens, who are undergoing rapid growth and daily development. Children and teens need anywhere between 8 and 13 hours of sleep a night depending on their age. But, screen use, especially exciting and engaging content before bed, can negatively impact the quality and quantity of children’s sleep.

NSF convened an expert group of researchers to develop consensus guidelines for screen use and sleep. We found that screen use across the day can impair sleep health for both children and teens, but that viewing content before bed was particularly bad for sleep. The good news is, that there are things your family can do to help lessen some negative effects of screen use on sleep.


What can help reduce the effects of screen use on sleep health?

Here are some things you can do to reduce the problems screen use may cause for children’s sleep:


Decisions around appropriate screen use involve the whole family.

When it comes to the use of technology and screens, every family is unique and knows what will fit best for their own dynamics. Deciding how and when screens are used in the home is an important part of helping everyone in the family prioritize their sleep health.

Appropriate screen use is just one part of healthy sleep. Be sure to check out  NSF’s Best Slept Self® tips to learn how you can make small changes to daytime and nighttime activities and improve sleep health. 

Making small changes to your family’s routine during the day and night, including how and when screens are used, can help everyone get the sleep they need to be their Best Slept Self®.


Manage Screen Use for Healthy Sleep in Children

Learn more about screen use and ways to improve your child’s sleep health.

Download Screen Use Infographic

When it comes to sleep, quantity is important—and so is quality. You might be getting enough hours of sleep, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re getting the highest quality sleep. 

Most adults need somewhere between seven and nine hours a night to wake up feeling like their Best Slept Self®, and a lot depends on exactly what happens during those hours. The quality of your sleep ensures that you get the essential physical, mental, and emotional benefits you need from your slumber. Sleep quality is an important component of sleep health along with sleep duration, sleep satisfaction, and sleep consistency (regularity).  

Defining Sleep Quality

Most people can rate their sleep as good, bad, or something in between.  In fact, you can directly observe many aspects of sleep quality. How you describe your sleep or the information that sleep tests and technology can capture, mostly fits into four different elements:  

These four elements were decided by an NSF-led expert group after an extensive review of 277 research studies and previously published in Sleep Health as a consensus guideline. If a scientist, expert, spokesperson, company, agency, or other source is talking about sleep quality without including these kinds of features, they may not be following the most complete and up-to-date recommendations.


The most recognized way to measure the four elements of sleep quality is the polysomnogram (PSG), which is an in-lab sleep test used in both research and clinical work. Recent technology innovations in at-home sleep tests make it possible to measure nearly all of the same sleep features as the in-lab PSG. Other devices with various sensors can capture some of these same sleep data and can be grouped into the following categories:

To help ensure sleep products gather the right information about a person’s sleep quality, NSF joined with the Consumer Technology Association® (CTA) to publish a new technology standard in 2024. This fifth standard for sleep devices from NSF and CTA is meant to help developers, product manufacturers, and the public know what’s expected of a product when it says it measures sleep quality. 


So, How’s Your Sleep Quality?

Now that you know what sleep quality is, how it is measured, and the role technology can play, let’s ask: how is your sleep quality? All of the dimensions of sleep quality can be self-rated following a night of sleep (sleep latency, awakenings, wake after sleep onset, and sleep efficiency). NSF recommends checklists based on age that can be a good measuring stick. If you answer “yes” to most of the questions below, congrats! you likely have good sleep quality. 

Adults (18-64 years old):

Older Adults (65 years old or more):


Improving Sleep Quality

If you’re concerned that your sleep quality is subpar, don’t fear, there are several things you can do. First, you can work to make some changes to your daytime and nighttime behaviors. NSF’s Best Slept Self® framework includes 6 small steps you can take during the day and at night to help you get the quality sleep you need. For instance, exercising 5 days a week, avoiding technology close to bedtime, and eating your meals at consistent times can help. Learn all the steps you can take to be your Best Slept Self® here

Second, you can consider adding some proven products or services to your daily lifestyle. Asking some straight-forward questions can help you choose which options may meet your own sleep quality needs:

Third, if you’re having specific symptoms or still not getting the sleep you need after using some of these solutions, it may be time to check with a healthcare professional. If you suspect a medical condition is at the root of your sleep problem, your healthcare provider can help find the source and work with you to choose appropriate treatment options that fit your needs.

Improving the quality of your sleep is an important part of waking up feeling energized and ready to tackle the day. NSF is here to help you be your Best Slept Self®.

Sleep Quality At-A-Glance

Learn more about sleep quality and ways to improve your sleep health.

Download Sleep Quality Infographic

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
NSFmedia@theNSF.org

Washington, D.C. (March 13, 2024): Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) hosted the first Congressional Briefing on sleep health and mental health as part of the organization’s 2024 Sleep Awareness Week® campaign (March 10-16).

The Congressional Briefing, entitled Sleep Health is Mental Health, complements NSF’s evergreen efforts to educate the public and policymakers about the importance of sleep for health and well-being. Members of Congress, staff, and interested stakeholders heard from a multidisciplinary expert panel about the connection between sleep health and mental health.  The purpose was to share current evidence and discuss opportunities for actionable solutions, while Congress works towards comprehensive mental health legislation. In July 2023, NSF hosted the first Congressional Briefing on Sleep Health Equity.

The United States is in the midst of a mental health crisis. The US Surgeon General, along with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health, have indicated the “mental health crisis” is among the biggest health challenges currently facing the United States.

NSF’s Congressional Briefing took place alongside other Sleep Awareness Week activities and events including the release of NSF’s latest Sleep in America® Poll results. NSF’s 2024 survey demonstrated the link between teens’ sleep health and mental health, and also found that teens who practiced more healthy sleep behaviors reported lower levels of depressive symptoms. These results build on the NSF’s 2023 survey of U.S. adults, which showed this same strong, two-way connection between sleep health and mental health.

“One of National Sleep Foundation’s purposes is to help equip policymakers and institutions to effect positive change, and sleep health and mental health are public health priorities.  People are in crisis, so it’s important we emphasize the clear connection between the two,” said John Lopos, CEO of NSF. “We’re thankful to have had the chance to host the first-ever Congressional Briefing on this topic and prime an essential conversation on the Hill.”

The Briefing began with introductory remarks from members of the Congressional Mental Health Caucus Representatives Buddy Carter (GA), Jamie Raskin (MD), and Paul Tonko (NY) and included provider insights presented by Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, Chair of NSF’s Board of Directors, NSF data presented by NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD, and an address from Joshua Gordon, MD, PhD, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health, among other speakers.

Also during Sleep Awareness Week® 2024, Congressman Jamie Raskin (MD), submitted an extension of remarks to the Congressional Record recognizing the campaign.  “As we mark Sleep Awareness Week, recognized this year by the National Sleep Foundation between March 10-16, we must elevate the importance of sleep health to our mental and physical health and confront the sleep disparities that closely correspond to racial and socioeconomic inequalities,” Raskin said. Raskin’s remarks were an extension to House Resolution 232, recognizing the importance of sleep health and expressing support for the designation of Sleep Awareness Week. Every year, NSF independently produces Sleep Awareness Week®, the premier campaign for sleep health.

For more information about the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Awareness Week® campaign, activities, and research about sleep health and mental health, visit Sleep Awareness Week® 2024.

About the National Sleep Foundation

There’s only one National Sleep Foundation (NSF).  NSF is an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. TheNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

One sign of getting enough of the quality sleep you need is how you feel during the day.  Most people know what they look and feel like when they’re refreshed and ready for the day after a good night’s sleep.  How we perform during the daytime is usually a sign of how we’ve slept the night before.

When we’re not satisfied with our sleep, it’s time to start taking small steps during the day and the night that can have a big impact on sleep. So, NSF promotes six basic healthy sleep behaviors that are backed by science and can help anyone and every be their Best Slept Self®.  

But if you’ve consistently given these steps a chance for a couple of weeks and still don’t feel you’re getting enough of the quality sleep you need, or you notice you have symptoms such as daytime sleepiness, it might be time to seek advice from a healthcare professional. Excessive daytime sleepiness isn’t just about being tired from a poor night’s sleep – it’s a recurring feeling of significant drowsiness that can make it hard to stay alert and awake during the daytime.  Sometimes it’s an effect of medicines you are taking, and sometimes it’s even a symptom of a diagnosable condition, including different sleep-wake disorders.

A clinician can help determine if your nighttime sleep disruption or daytime sleepiness are caused by an underlying medical problem. Physical conditions like pain, urinary system issues, and hormonal issues are common sleep disruptors.  Depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions are well-documented to travel together with sleep problems.  And all of these can have the next-day effects of making you feel tired and not your best.  Two of the most common sleep disorders,  insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; see this link for more information) are clearly connected to feeling tired or sleepy during the day.  But there also are more rare sleep disorders that have the hallmark characteristics of excessive daytime sleepiness

Two of these more rare conditions are narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH). Diagnosing and treating these conditions usually needs expert attention from sleep medicine specialists.

Narcolepsy is a rare neurological disorder affecting the sleep-wake cycle. It’s characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and other symptoms such as cataplexy (a sudden loss of muscle control), disrupted nighttime sleep, hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Recognizing and diagnosing narcolepsy early is important. Diagnosis involves physical examinations and specialized sleep studies. Although there is no cure, prescription medicines have been approved by the FDA to treat a range of symptoms.  FDA approved medicines for narcolepsy include: 

Along with medicines, living with and managing narcolepsy often includes other approaches like practicing basic healthy sleep behaviors, cognitive-behavioral and psychological support therapies, and even accommodations in workplace or educational settings. 

Idiopathic Hypersomnia (IH) is a rare sleep disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness despite sufficient nighttime sleep. It’s different from narcolepsy. When compared to the experience with narcolepsy, people with idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) tend to sleep longer at night and may find it challenging to wake up because of prolonged confusion upon awakening (known as sleep inertia). Even though they may sleep longer, people with IH typically report they don’t feel refreshed after sleep. What’s more, they may take long naps and still feel unrefreshed afterward. Diagnosing IH involves ruling out other conditions and calls for a sleep medicine specialist to perform a sleep study. Treatment focuses on symptom management with medications, and though several types of stimulants are often prescribed off-label for IH, only recently was low-sodium oxybate approved for this use by FDA. It is taken by mouth either once or twice a night. Here too, adopting healthy sleep behaviors that help with consistency and regular sleep patterns can be appropriate for people with IH.  Addressing broader behavioral and environmental factors is crucial. More research may show how cognitive-behavioral therapy, sleep regulation, physical activity, scheduled napping, and dietary adjustments complement medication and offer their own benefits in treatment for IH. 

This content was produced independently by the National Sleep Foundation and brought to you by Avadel Pharmaceuticals and Jazz Pharmaceuticals, sponsors of the 2024 Sleep Awareness Week® campaign. 

A message from our sponsors: 

Avadel is a biopharmaceutical company focused on transforming medicine to transform lives. 

Jazz Pharmaceuticals is a global biopharmaceutical company with the purpose to innovate to transform the lives of patients and their families. 

One of the first things we need to understand is the teenage years are one of the most critical periods of our development. Most teens experience rapid physical growth, their brains go through crucial transformation, they start firming up their social roles and identity, and they build skills for emotional regulation. That’s a lot being packed into a very demanding time of life. With health, teens often find themselves at a crossroads: their habits can take a negative trajectory, or they can form positive routines that can help them thrive now and over the course of their lives.

Adopting good sleep habits is critical during this time in a teen’s life and important for their growth, health, and well-being. So, where does sleep fit in the big picture for teens? For starters, getting enough quality sleep plays a big part in the behavioral and emotional health they’ll need during adolescence and beyond. But, teens have unique sleep needs that are distinct from both children and adults.

How much sleep do teens need?

Teens’ sleep differs from adults’ in that they generally require more hours of sleep to meet the demands of their growth and development. While most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep, teens typically need between 8-10 hours, sometimes up to 11.  Here’s a wake-up call:  less than 2 out of 10 teens report getting the NSF’s recommended 8-10 hours of sleep on both school days and weekends.

Teens’ unique sleep schedules

Like all of us, teens have a natural “body clock” or “circadian” clock that affects the timing of their sleep, plus a “drive” for sleep that makes them feel tired. In fact, our internal body clock changes during the teen years. Circadian rhythms start to shift later after childhood, causing teens to naturally stay up later at night before feeling tired, and then not feel alert until later in the morning. The take home message here is that it’s normal for teens’ brains and bodies to keep them up later at night and not be quite ready to go until later the next morning (hint: be prepared for this shift to stay in effect until a teen reaches their early 20s).

This natural pattern conflicts with unique social challenges and common practices like early school start times, which are tough on teens for biological reasons. So, in these situations, it’s difficult for teens to get the recommended 8-10 hours of sleep because they’re not tired early enough at night to sleep and then have to wake up early in the morning while still biologically sleepy. NSF’s 2024 Sleep in America® Poll highlighted this mismatch, showing that teens are nearly half as likely to get the recommended 8-10 hours of sleep on school nights compared to weekends. And teens themselves feel these effects.  The same study showed teens are over three times as likely to be dissatisfied with the amount of sleep they get on school nights compared to weekends.  

If teens’ sleep needs and timing patterns weren’t special enough, pile on the list of other influences like their use of technologies with screens, social behaviors, and busy activity schedules. There’s some evidence that exposure to bright light, particularly blue light, in the evening hours can even further delay when teens feel sleepy. Scientifically, light, especially within the hour before bedtime, can delay the brain’s release of the hormone melatonin which might make it harder to fall asleep. While the story of light’s effect on teen sleep is building, it’s even more important to manage the alerting activities teens are doing on screens before sleep.  Social media engagement, exciting or disturbing content at bedtime—including negative social comments and comparisons—all can interfere with healthy sleep. Teens’ use of common technologies also can directly compete with their sleep, like when they purposefully put off sleep to stay active on electronic devices. Their scheduling challenges, such as extracurricular activities and multiple demands on their time, can make it difficult for teens to allow sufficient opportunities for sleep. They may even compensate for missed sleep with a late-day or evening nap, also making it harder for them to fall asleep at night.

Helping teens to set healthy sleep habits

The teenage years are a great opportunity to set healthy sleep habits. Parents and families can be most effective in helping their teens set healthy sleep habits by actively respecting their growing independence and autonomy, helping them prioritize the importance of sleep, and making a caring connection.

·   Encourage teens to share their values, goals, and think about how healthy sleep can help them achieve those goals. Give teens the autonomy to decide what they want to focus on in their sleep health.

·   Give teens information to understand and prioritize the benefits of sleep and making good decisions. For example, how do their role models and high-performance people use healthy sleep to be at their best?

·   Consider the social context in which teens make decisions about sleep, understanding how their peers value sleep, and help them prioritize sleep in a way that actually raises their social status.

·   Champion how healthy sleep is practiced and prioritized within the family.

Helping teens establish good sleep habits is doable and worth it. It can require some effort and time, but encouraging them to create positive, healthy sleep habits now can help them be their Best Slept Self® over their entire lives.

Getting enough quality sleep plays a pivotal role in the health and well-being of teens.  It’s strongly tied to and impacts their mental health.

Healthy sleep is linked to improved emotional functioning in teens, which can help manage anxiety, depression, and reported stress among those who get sufficient sleep. For example, NSF’s 2024 Sleep in America® Poll found that teens who get the recommended 8-10 hours of sleep each night have lower levels of depressive symptoms. It could be these positive effects are partly due to the role sleep plays in regulating emotions and maintaining a stable mood. On the other hand, regularly disrupted sleep is associated with more mood swings, irritability, and increased emotional reactivity. In fact, the same NSF study showed that nearly seven out of ten teens who are dissatisfied with their sleep also reported elevated depressive symptoms.  Adequate sleep is key to building emotional resilience, and it can help teens more effectively work though some of the challenges they can experience during adolescence. When people sleep poorly, they are more likely to interpret the world around them in a negative light. With regular, sufficient, and healthy sleep, we have a more positive outlook. This benefit of sleep could help teens avoid an overload of negative emotions during the day.

Beyond its impact on emotional well-being, healthy sleep is crucial for cognitive functioning and academic performance in teenagers. Teens who consistently get enough sleep are better equipped to concentrate, retain information, and excel in school. However, insufficient sleep may lead to difficulties in problem-solving, decision-making, and overall cognitive abilities, which can negatively impact a teen’s academic success and long-term mental well-being.

Getting enough quality sleep also helps teens cope with the stress of their evolving physical, social, and emotional worlds. During deep sleep, the brain regulates stress hormones such as cortisol. Teens who consistently get enough sleep (NSF recommends 8-10 hours each night) can be better equipped to cope with stressors and have less risk of developing chronic stress-related mental health issues. What’s troubling is the vast majority of teens, 80% in a recent NSF poll, are not getting enough sleep.

During adolescence, teens are also navigating new behaviors that require decision-making skills and impulse control. Healthy sleep contributes to improved behavior in teens, leading to fewer accidents, reduced substance use, fewer reckless behaviors, and a lower risk of other health problems.

Promoting sleep health early with teens is worth it. It’s a positive step to help them feel better, be safer, perform better, cope more effectively, and choose healthier behaviors that can set them up for success over the long-term.

You’re a teenager?  Great, this is for you! (We already wrote something for adults).

Take a few minutes to look inside yourself and see what’s important to you. What defines you? Who do you aspire to be? Did you know sleep powers your mind, body, emotions, and health?  Sleep helps you to be ready and able to pursue and achieve many of your goals.  Seriously, have you ever tried to do anything that’s really important to you when you’re tired, even exhausted?  What are the great things you can do when you are your Best Slept Self®?

We know it’s hard to prioritize your sleep when there are a lot of distractions and interruptions out there from things you see, hear, buy, and use every day—whatever can get in the way of you getting enough of the quality sleep you need.  But think about what’s possible, and how you can be you, when you’re feeling great after a night of healthy sleep.

High-performance people—thinkers, doers, creatives, athletes, celebrities, everyday leaders, and influencers—they understand sleep is a power within us that energizes what we do and can even give us a boost or a competitive edge.

Healthy sleep is for everyone, including you. You’re worth getting the sleep you need for your happiness and well-being!

So, as you decide what you can do about your sleep health, consider this: scientific studies show most teens need 8-10 hours of sleep per night. This can be challenging as your natural body clock (circadian rhythm) keeps you alert late into the night and feeling sleepy well into the morning hours.  Oh, and if you’re like most teens, you still need to be ready to start school early and keep a demanding schedule! In fact, 7 out of 10 teens have to be present for school before 8:30am. Plus—and how many times have you heard this—being on screens late at night can further disrupt your body clock and can keep your mind and emotions going when you should be sleeping.  We’re pretty sure you know what we’re talking about: the rabbit hole of scrolls and chats and games and surfs and posts (sorry, not all of them friendly, btw—stay strong!) and…all that alerting and engaging content can make it difficult to fall asleep. Not to mention demands from school, sports, extracurricular activities, your family, and more. Perhaps it feels like the only time you have ‘free’ from all the demands of your day is at night, so you might have the urge to use that time on things beside sleep.

Well, you can get past these challenges with some basic tips to help you be a Best Slept® Teen:

Daytime Tips for Teens:

1. Light: Get sunlight or bright light as soon as possible in the morning after waking up to boost your alertness during the day and help get deeper sleep at night. Trust us, it’s a science thing.

2. Exercise: Exercise regularly for a deeper sleep. This can include participating in sports or other physical extracurricular activities. Even if you’re not the physical type, it’s good to get your blood flowing for even 30 minutes a day.

3. Mealtimes: Eating meals at consistent times day after day can help your sleep. It may be tough given your active schedule.  Whatever works for you for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, focus on being as consistent as you can. Actually, having a consistent schedule overall is great for sleep.

Nighttime Tips for Teens:

1. Avoid: Allow your mind and body to relax by avoiding caffeine in the late afternoon and evening. You may also want to avoid late-day or evening naps, because they can lessen your “drive” for sleep and make it harder to fall asleep when you want to at night. If you must, grab a short nap in the afternoon. It is also best to stay away from heavy meals and nicotine before bed.

2. Wind-down: Use a consistent routine that relaxes you to help get the sleep you need each night. You could try meditation, listening to soothing music, dimming the lights, or reading a book. Try to commit to a consistent bedtime and wake-up time.  It’s doable with reminders and a regular routine.  And it’s important to avoid excessive sleep-ins on weekends so you don’t have a difficult adjustment on Mondays when you’re back in action.

3. Environment: Create an optimal sleep environment by making your bedroom dark, quiet, and cool. And, put those electronic devices away. Sure, that might sound impossible, and you’re not alone in not wanting to stay connected. But using screens in bed can be stimulating and can also can turn your sleeping space into a cue to be awake rather than to sleep. Yes, it really happens, and it’s an unhealthy habit that’s hard to break.

What are three actions specific to you, that you can take for better sleep health?

1.

2.  

3.  

Remember, you have the power to shape who you want to be, and healthy sleep is definitely part of that. Make choices that prioritize your health, allowing you to be your Best Slept Self. It’s worth it!

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
NSFmedia@theNSF.org

National Sleep Foundation Says Teens’ Sleep Health and Mental Health Strongly Linked

NSF releases important new public health findings from its annual poll in advance of Sleep Awareness Week®

Washington, D.C. (March 7, 2024) – To kick off Sleep Awareness Week® 2024 (March 10-16), the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) released new findings from their annual Sleep in America® Poll. This year focused on exploring the important connection between sleep health and mental health in American teens. Results from this first-of-its-kind study in teens found that healthy sleep behaviors are closely linked to mental health in teens. Nearly 80% of teens who earn a grade of ‘B’ or higher for practicing healthy sleep behaviors are also free of significant depressive symptoms. 

Additional key results from the representative, population-level research show:

Importantly, these results expand the base of knowledge about the connection between sleep health and mental health in the American public.  In 2023, NSF’s Sleep in America Poll® highlighted this similar connection in the general US adult population. As the US continues to face a mental health crisis, teens are in a particularly unenviable position, facing unique challenges and with unique sleep needs. 

“We’ve continued to emphasize for the public that sleep is critical for our health and well-being,” said John Lopos, National Sleep Foundation CEO, “and in the context of the mental health crisis it’s important to put more evidence behind the strong connection with sleep, especially in our kids.  This is a call to action for teens, families, educators, communities, and policymakers. What’s encouraging is we see where healthy sleep fits.” 

An annual survey, the Sleep in America Poll is one of the longest-running records capturing U.S. perceptions, attitudes, and trends in sleep health. The 2024 report combined results from a variety of sleep health tools, including NSF’s Sleep Health Index®, Sleep Satisfaction Tool®, and its Best Slept Self® Questionnaire, to assess how teens sleep and the PHQ-A to evaluate depressive symptoms in teens. 

“We combined NSF’s multiple validated measures of the population’s sleep health with an established measure of depressive symptoms to examine the link between sleep health and depressive symptoms in teenagers,” said Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD, Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs at the National Sleep Foundation. “As a licensed clinician and a parent, the time is now to think about the important two-way connection between our sleep and mental health. Helping teens build healthy sleep habits can have a lasting, positive impact on their physical and mental health.” 

Also during Sleep Awareness Week 2024, NSF will be holding a Congressional Briefing entitled Sleep Health is Mental Health, on Wednesday, March 13. Members of Congress, staff, and interested stakeholders will hear from a multidisciplinary expert panel about the association between sleep health and mental health, plus discuss opportunities to effect positive change while Congress works towards comprehensive mental health legislation.

Sleep Awareness Week 2024 is sponsored through unrestricted funding and support from Avadel, Eisai, Inc., Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Waymo, Apnimed, Purecare, Asleep, Harmony Biosciences, Idorsia, NextSense, Variowell, PocketKado, Ozlo, Samsung Health, and Withings. 

Collaborators include American Heart Association, National PTA, Mental Health America, National Alliance on Mental Illness, National Organization for Youth Safety, Students Against Destructive Decisions, Rural Minds, National Coalition for the Homeless, and Higi who, among many other organizations and agencies, help to promote NSF’s sleep health messages.

For more sleep health information and to learn ways to help be your Best Slept Self®, visit www.theNSF.org. 

If you’re still not getting the sleep you need after taking some basic steps, or if you have lasting symptoms, it’s a good idea to talk with your healthcare provider. That’s especially true if you are having challenges with your mood or feelings of depression. You are not alone. For anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts, please seek care. Contact the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline by calling or texting 988.

###

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. TheNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

About the Sleep in America® Poll

The Sleep in America Poll is the National Sleep Foundation’s premier annual review of current sleep topics. The Poll was first conducted in 1991 and has been produced since 2018 by Langer Research Associates. The full Sleep in America Poll findings, including methodology, can be found at theNSF.org/sleep-in-america-polls/.

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
NSFmedia@theNSF.org

National Sleep Foundation Announces 2024 Dates for Sleep Awareness Week®

Campaign to include Congressional Briefing on Sleep and Mental Health

Washington, D.C. (January 24, 2024): Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announced Sleep Awareness Week® 2024 will take place from March 10-16. Sleep Awareness Week, now in its 26th year, is the NSF’s annual campaign emphasizing the importance of sleep to health and well-being and a call to action for the public to prioritize getting enough of the quality sleep they need.

As part of this year’s campaign, NSF further announced it will hold a Congressional Briefing on sleep health and mental health on Wednesday, March 13. The Briefing is entitled Sleep Health is Mental Health. Members of Congress, staff, and interested stakeholders will hear from a multidisciplinary expert panel about the association between sleep health and mental health, plus discuss opportunities to effect positive change while Congress works towards comprehensive mental health legislation.

Established in 1998 by the National Sleep Foundation, Sleep Awareness Week is the premier awareness and education campaign for sleep health. Each year, NSF releases the results of its hallmark Sleep in America® Poll during the campaign week. The Sleep in America poll helps the public understand key attitudes, behaviors, and experiences with sleep health and explores a broad range of topics from aging, to exercise, to pain, to incorporating healthy sleep behaviors into daily living. Most recently, the 2023 Sleep in America poll reinforced how sleep health and healthy sleep behaviors are strongly associated with mental health in adults.

“National Sleep Foundation continues to be a unique, evergreen resource for the public and any organization concerned about the connection between sleep and health,” said Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, Chair of the NSF Board of Directors. “During Sleep Awareness Week we are excited to release important results and the latest insights from our newest research with the public:  these data continue to reveal opportunities to increase the importance of sleep health among the public.”

Sleep Awareness Week begins at the start of Daylight Saving Time when most Americans change their clocks and lose an hour of sleep. 

“If we want to improve our health and look and feel our best, we can start by focusing on our sleep,” said John Lopos, CEO of NSF. “NSF is here to help anyone and everyone be their Best Slept Self® and ultimately that’s what our Sleep Awareness Week campaign and our everyday promise is all about.”

NSF independently produces the Sleep in America poll, Sleep Awareness Week, and all related official educational content. The campaign reaches millions of people in the US and abroad and generates billions of media impressions each year. Campaign materials can be found on the NSF website

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice. 

TheNSF.org │ SleepHealthJournal.org

Thinking about tech to help with your sleep? These options could boost your bedtime experience.

Getting the sleep you need is important to your health and feeling well during the day. If you find yourself wanting something more to help you fall asleep or stay asleep, you may benefit from using smart technology and sleep devices. These tools are designed to help improve your sleep experience, so adding them to your bedtime (or daytime!) routine may provide solutions to your sleep challenges. Here are just a few of the product areas you may want to consider to help you understand your sleep better and improve your comfort in a sleep-friendly space that’s dark, quiet, and cool.

Sleep Tracker

There are many different types of sleep trackers offering a broad range of features. These wearable and “nearable” tech devices can measure your heart rate, breathing patterns, and body movement to provide feedback that may improve your sleep. Depending on the device, you will typically strap one to your wrist, wear it on your finger, or place it on your nightstand. Some trackers can also monitor sleep duration, sleep quality, sleep phases, and environmental factors like room temperature and light exposure. Many of these devices or applications give you a “sleep score,” with each one sharing different types of sleep data that make up the score.  Consider this: the total score can be a high-level view of how well you slept, so think about the healthy sleep behaviors you did (or didn’t!) use before you went to sleep and got that score!

In addition, some track lifestyle factors that can influence your sleep by allowing you to input information about how much caffeine you drank before bed and whether you are feeling stressed. You can sync these gadgets to your phone or computer to track your data. Based on the data gathered, sleep trackers can identify patterns in your sleep habits and suggest tips that may improve sleep quantity and quality. Some devices even offer expert sleep content to help improve users’ understanding of their sleep. As an example, National Sleep Foundation sleep health education, tips and personal sleep insights are available to millions of Samsung Health app users through their Galaxy products.

Sleep headbands are another way to monitor and potentially improve your sleep. These headbands can generate audio tones aimed at enhancing the quality of deep sleep. Some even come with mobile apps that track your sleep patterns over time and measure key metrics.

Smart Mattress 

A smart mattress is typically designed to track aspects of your sleep and monitor the temperature and firmness of your bed to provide a personalized sleep experience. A grid of sensors embedded in the mattress can automatically adjust the amount of support the mattress provides, increasing or decreasing the bed’s firmness based on the distribution of your weight and your sleep position. Smart mattresses are a growing category and one way to invest in your sleep, and there are multiple options available to suit your specific needs.

One type of smart mattress combines sensors and silent air pumps to inflate or deflate the mattress according to personal preference and gives you the option to choose manual or automatic pressure adjustments. Another type uses sensors to detect your sleeping position and modify pressure for support and comfort. Some smart mattresses have additional features, such as pre-warming the bed to your preferred temperature and customizing the firmness on each side of the bed to suit a couple’s different sleeping preferences.  As smart mattress technology continues to develop, these products get better at “knowing” more about your individual sleep style and preferences, so they can be part of a more consistent, personalized sleep experience for you.

Top of the Bed 

Smart pillows are designed to enhance comfort while monitoring and tracking things like breathing patterns and sleep habits. Some smart pillows include built-in speakers with the ability to stream podcasts, music, and audiobooks that only you can hear, helping you drift off to sleep faster. Other devices regulate your pillow’s temperature while you sleep and keep your pillow consistently cool through a thermo-regulation system.

You can also attach bed sensor pads to your mattress to identify your sleep habits. These high-tech pads connect with activity trackers to assess whether lifestyle habits such as eating patterns or physical activity may impact your sleep. In addition, bed sensor pads can communicate with other smart devices in your home to adjust your thermostat, lighting, and noise levels and set your alarm clock to ensure you wake up on time. 

Lighting

Light is a very important factor for our sleep, linked to our natural circadian biology. Getting sunlight or equivalent indoor brightness early in the morning is a good thing, but light during the night can cause problems for sleep.  Different types of light can affect your quality of sleep. Recent innovations in sleep lighting technology can help you create a living and bedroom environment that is more conducive to sleep, such as electronically controlled window shades and blinds, or smart bulbs that gradually fade when it’s near your bedtime and slowly brighten your room in the morning (some bulbs even mimic the color of sunrise). You can also purchase bulbs that shift from warm red hues to cool blue ones, depending on the time of day. 

Other lighting innovations include operation through smartphone apps or voice-assisted tech devices–like Amazon’s Alexa, Samsung’s Bixby, Apple’s Siri, or Google Home–that let you control the bedroom lights wirelessly, so you don’t have to get up to shut them off when you’re ready to sleep. If you are reading on your tablet or watching TV at night, try using blue light filters to reduce your exposure to the blue hues that the devices emit, which can affect your natural sleep/wake cycle. 

Sleep Environment 

Certain devices can help you create a sleep-friendly environment to improve your bedtime experience, and may even help to promote sleep. Sound conditioners are designed to reduce external noises that interfere with your sleep. These can be white noise machines, which combine all noise frequencies to create a steady background hum that masks distractions. They may also be pink noise machines, which aim to improve sleep by releasing high and low frequencies to slow and regulate brain waves. Sound conditioners often produce calming and relaxing sounds, such as waterfalls, nature, soothing music, ocean waves, and rain.

Even home appliances like dishwashers, clothes washers, and dryers that are being designed to be quieter (and meet “quiet” standards) may help keep noise down in the connected living space, for people who run them close to bedtime.

Another way to improve your sleep environment: give the air quality in your bedroom an upgrade with an air purifier. Air purifiers remove harmful contaminants, such as pollen and dust. Poor air quality can affect the soundness of your sleep, which in turn can affect your sleep satisfaction. Keeping your bedroom air clean may help you sleep better throughout the night. 

Let’s not forget about temperature. National Sleep Foundation generally recommends a sleep environment of around 67 degrees Fahrenheit, though individual needs can vary.  Some “high-tech” sheets and mattress toppers are designed with specialized fabrics and materials, keeping heat regulation and cooling in mind. Technology in apps and climate control devices (i.e., fans, air conditioners, heaters) can coordinate and help manage the temperature in your bedroom and other rooms of your living space.  Smart home technology is an evolving area that can help maintain a sleep-friendly environment.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: 
NSF Communications
NSFmedia@theNSF.org

National Sleep Foundation Launches SleepTech® Network
Premier Community Forum for Stakeholders in the Sleep Technology Industry

Las Vegas, Nev. (January 9, 2024): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) today launched its SleepTech® Network, a new community forum for stakeholders across the sleep technology industry. The announcement comes from CES® in Las Vegas, a trade show that showcases the entire tech landscape. NSF is exhibiting at Booth 8604 in the North Hall in Tech East. 

Among the inaugural members of the SleepTech® Network are organizations ranging from high-profile start-ups to representatives of the Fortune Global 500, reflecting important segments including consumer electronics, digital therapeutics, mobility, consumer home products, and sleep-monitoring AI software. Members include Asleep, Pocket Kado, PureCare, Samsung Health, Variowell, and Waymo. 

NSF’s SleepTech Network benefits members through education, insights, and access, including to NSF resources and each other. Each organization can stay informed and up-to-date with the latest NSF research and data on sleep health technology, while network members learn about advances with other professionals in the field of SleepTech, discuss sleep technology issues and opportunities, and interact with peers at NSF-hosted educational events. 

Kickoff activities for SleepTech® Network members include a briefing on rates of electronic device use before bedtime and associated sleep characteristics, along with public beliefs about the sleep-related consequences of pre-sleep electronic use. Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD, NSF’s Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs will lead the briefing, exploring NSF’s newest research results and key findings.   

“NSF sees the potential SleepTech® has to help the public’s health and well-being. It’s a fast-growing global industry, and NSF’s role is not just to advocate for and support innovation in this space, but also to do our part and help others understand and navigate it in a way that can improve sleep health,” said John Lopos, NSF CEO.

NSF is committed to making science-based SleepTech more accessible and convenient so anyone and everyone can be their Best Slept Self®. For over 30 years, NSF has educated the public about the importance of sleep for health and well-being. NSF has promoted positive sleep health through published expert recommendations, consensus guidelines, technology standards, and easy-to-use tips and tools to improve sleep. 

For more information about NSF’s SleepTech Network, and to apply, visit theNSF.org/sleeptech-network.

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

Embr Labs and Pocket Kado Win National Sleep Foundation’s 2023 SleepTech® Award 

Washington, D.C. (December 6, 2023): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) named Embr Labs and Pocket Kado as winners of the 2023 SleepTech® Award. NSF’s SleepTech Award recognizes the year’s most innovative efforts in advancing sleep technology and is a feature of NSF’s ongoing work to encourage and celebrate efforts by which sleep science and insight are rapidly incorporated into accessible health products and services.

The SleepTech Award is given in two categories: Sleep Health and Wellness, which includes products and services consumers can use as part of their daily routine for sleep and health; and Sleep Disorders and Conditions, which includes solutions that seek to improve the patient experience for diagnosis and treatment.

Embr Labs’ Ember Wave® is the winner in the Sleep Health and Wellness category. As described by Embr Labs, the Ember Wave wrist-worn device delivers soothing cool or warm waves of temperature to the inside of the wrist to help users drift off to sleep, diminish nighttime bursts of warmth or night sweats that can disrupt sleep, and prevent returning to sleep, and help keep users from waking throughout the night.

Pocket Kado, the winner in the Sleep Disorders and Conditions category, describes their product as the world’s first science-backed virtual pet game to help users sleep. Through gameplay, users can develop their sleep hygiene and maintain routines that align with their circadian rhythm, which also may help users live well with insomnia, including if they have completed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I).

“We congratulate Embr Labs and Pocket Kado for winning our 2023 SleepTech Award. Both organizations have innovative approaches that draw from sleep science and insight, offering the potential to help people get the quality sleep they need,” said John Lopos, National Sleep Foundation CEO. 

“We are honored and grateful to be recognized by the National Sleep Foundation for the positive impact that the Embr Wave can have on sleep. Receiving the SleepTech® Award is a testament to the power of temperature to improve well-being. We believe quality sleep is the foundation of a healthy, happy life, and Embr Wave can be a powerful option for anyone looking to improve their sleep,” said Sam Shames, Co-founder and COO of Embr Labs.

“We are elated to receive the National Sleep Foundation’s SleepTech® Award after developing Pocket Kado with sleep experts for the past several years. This award is especially meaningful as we share NSF’s mission to make healthy sleep accessible to everyone. With this award, we aim to inspire further collaboration between technology companies and clinical scientists, as our understanding of sleep evolves,” said Khoa Tran, CEO of Pocket Kado.

NSF would also like to acknowledge three SleepTech Award finalists in each category: Lumos, Oxa, and Ozlo in the Sleep Health and Wellness Category and breathesimple, NextSense, and SleepImage in the Sleep Disorders and Conditions category.

For over 30 years, NSF has educated the public about the importance of sleep health to overall health and well-being. NSF has published consensus papers, guidelines, and standards for positive sleep health as well as easy-to-use tools and tips to improve sleep. NSF is committed to making science-based sleep tech more accessible and convenient so anyone and everyone can be their Best Slept Self®.

The National Sleep Foundation has no financial relationship with any of the 2023 SleepTech Award winners. For more information about the National Sleep Foundation, visit www.theNSF.org

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release

Contact: Stephanie Kohn
skohn@thensf.org

 

Congressional Resolution 853 Supports the Designation of Drowsy Driving Prevention Week®

Washington, DC (November 9, 2023) — Representatives Madeleine Dean and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, and Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester of Delaware, introduced House Resolution 853 in the U.S. House of Representatives. Developed by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) and with additional data and statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, the resolution supports the designation of “Drowsy Driving Prevention Week” to raise awareness about the dangers of drowsy driving and encourages people across the United States to take preventable steps against drowsy driving.

NSF is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice. NSF established Drowsy Driving Prevention Week®, held each fall at the end of Daylight Saving Time, to raise awareness about the importance of sleep and the risks of driving while drowsy. Drowsy driving is impaired driving. It is a relatable experience that is dangerously common, but preventable. Drowsy driving starts when people are young drivers.  A recent NSF survey of teen drivers found in their first two years of driving, 1 in 6 teens have already driven while drowsy. 95% of teens also say drowsy driving is risky, but most rate drunk, drugged, and distracted driving as more dangerous. Similarly, adults consider drowsy driving less risky than other forms of impaired driving.

“NSF applauds Congress for recognizing Drowsy Driving Prevention Week. Drowsy driving is impaired driving and a public health concern that everyone can take steps to prevent,” said John Lopos, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation. “It starts by getting enough quality sleep to be your Best Slept Self®, which is important for our safe driving and responsibility to each other on the road.”

“Drowsy Driving Prevention Week raises awareness of the dangers of driving while fatigued or sleepy and educates drivers on how to keep themselves and others safe,” Rep. Dean said. “The National Sleep Foundation has been a leader in making our roads safer, and I’m grateful for their partnership in recognizing this week of advocacy to help save lives.”

For the past 30 years, NSF has educated the public about the importance of sleep health in relation to overall health and well-being. NSF has published consensus papers and guidelines for positive sleep health. Most recently, coinciding with Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, NSF has released a Drowsy Driving Position Statement.

For more information about National Sleep Foundation’s leadership in sleep health and Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, visit www.theNSF.org

###

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice.
theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

Young male teen behind the wheel with parent in passenger seat

You’d never risk being a drunk driver, right? You know the tragic results of a drunk driving crash are very real. There may even be a person in your life who’s been affected by drunk driving. We all know better than to drink and drive.

Similar to most teens your age, you probably think driving while drunk is riskier than driving while you’re sleepy. And that’s what most adults think, too. But, when people drive after sleeping four hours or less, it’s like they’re driving drunk. Almost everyone in a new study of over 1,100 teens said drowsy driving is extremely or very risky. But by comparison, almost 25% fewer teens in the same study said that drowsy driving had the same level of risk. It’s time to wake up to the fact that drowsy driving is impaired driving, too. Remember this: sleep first and drive alert.

The good thing is that most teens say they don’t drive while drowsy. If this is you, keep it up, because the statistics only get worse among adult drivers. So, where to start? Start with your sleep. Right now, life can be hectic and sometimes it feels like sleep is the last thing on your mind. But people 16-25 already are in the highest risk group for drowsy driving crashes. The good thing is your sleep is something you can take control of—be sure to get enough (as many as 10 hours a night) so you can stay healthy and ready to perform. That includes being alert behind the wheel if you are driving. 

Here’s why teenagers are more susceptible to drowsy driving

  1. Chronic Sleep Deprivation: Teens actually need more sleep than adults. Your brain is still developing, and NSF recommends that you get 8-10 hours of sleep each night.
  2. Learning to Drive: Teens are relatively new to driving, which means you have less experience and fewer driving skills to rely on during emergencies.
  3. Early School Hours: Many schools have early start times, which don’t always sync up with your internal body clock, also called your circadian rhythm
  4. Busy Schedules: Between school, jobs, family commitments, extracurricular activities, homework, and late-night screen time with friends, teens often sacrifice sleep to fit everything in.

How to ensure you get enough sleep

  1. Prioritize Sleep: Try to put Sleep First™. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 8-10 hours of sleep a night for teens. 
  2. Naps: Short power naps (20-30 minutes) can recharge you if you’re feeling tired during the day. But don’t nap for hours – it’ll mess up your nighttime sleep.
  3. Limit Screen Time: Cut down on screens before bedtime. That means less late-night scrolling and binge-watching. 
  4. Start Your Day with Light: In the morning, spend time in bright outdoor light to feel most alert.

Driving when you’re really sleepy is just as risky as driving while under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or distractions. Not getting enough quality sleep can jeopardize your safety behind the wheel. 

Stay safe on the road

  1. Don’t Hesitate to Get a Ride: If you’re burning the midnight oil studying or coming home late from an event, don’t feel pressured to drive when you’re exhausted. Consider reaching out to a parent or a friend for a ride if you’re too worn out to drive safely.
  2. Buddy Up Behind the Wheel: Having a friend in the car can help keep you alert. If your passenger is more awake, switch positions and let the alert driver take control. When embarking on long journeys, plan with your companions or fellow driver to switch every hour or so.
  3. Take a Power Nap: If you’re feeling tired before hitting the road, take a quick 20-minute nap. 
  4. Spot the Warning Signs: Learn to recognize signs of fatigue among yourself and your friends, including frequent yawning, struggling to keep your eyes open, having trouble remembering recent miles driven, missing exits or road signs, drifting into other lanes, hitting rumble strips, and more.

Remember, we’re all in this together. And good habits you start now can be even more important as you get older. Let’s keep our roads safe and make responsible choices behind the wheel. Your life and the lives of others depend on it. Sleep First. Drive Alert.™ 

For Immediate Release

Media Contact: 
Stephanie Kohn 
skohn@theNSF.org

National Sleep Foundation Study Results Show Drowsy Driving Begins During Teen Years
New survey of teen drivers shows attitudes and actions about impaired driving, implications for sleep health  

Washington, D.C. (November 2, 2023) – Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) released results of a new survey of American teens highlighting their attitudes and behaviors about drowsy driving. Teens reported driving drowsy at high rates, especially considering their status as new drivers. Teens also said school and job commitments were the top factors keeping them from getting the sleep they need to drive alert. A corresponding NSF survey of US adult drivers showed similar results about the top contributors to their drowsiness behind the wheel but with greater frequency of driving while drowsy. Teens and adults called drowsy driving “highly risky.”

National Sleep Foundation’s 2023 Drowsy Driving Survey was fielded as part of Drowsy Driving Prevention Week®, NSF’s annual campaign to help Americans get the sleep they need and reduce the number of drivers who get behind the wheel while sleep-deprived. NSF urges everyone to Sleep First. Drive Alert.TM  

Drowsy driving is a public health issue linked to thousands of car crashes each year, killing an estimated 6,400 people annually in the U.S. alone, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. NSF and other expert sources believe crash and fatality data are likely underestimated. NSF’s 2023 survey data show drowsy driving is common among American adults, where six in ten adult drivers admit to having driven a car when they were so tired they had a hard time keeping their eyes open. These findings are consistent with NSF’s 2022 results, reinforcing the ongoing need for education about the importance of sleep health.

Key results from teen drivers, featured this year, showed

“Other science and research previously established teens and young people are at high risk for drowsy driving.  What we see in our results this year is many teens, early in their driving experience, say they’ve already driven while drowsy. Overall, teens know the risks of drowsy driving, but don’t think it’s as risky as other forms of impaired driving,” said Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD, Vice President, Research and Scientific Affairs, National Sleep Foundation. “The good news is – drowsy driving is preventable, and there’s a lot we can teach our young drivers about the importance of getting the sleep they need before they get behind the wheel.”

There are steps people can take to help lessen the risk
 

“At NSF, we’re dedicated to helping everyone prioritize their sleep for health and safety,” said John Lopos, CEO, National Sleep Foundation. “Getting enough quality sleep to be your Best Slept Self® is also important for our safe driving and responsibility on the road.”

NSF independently produces Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® and all related official educational content. Drowsy Driving Prevention Week 2023 sponsors include Waymo, Schneider National, General Motors, Samsung Health, Eisai Inc., and Asleep. Visit the NSF website to see a full list of collaborators for the 2023 Drowsy Driving Prevention Week campaign, including the Autonomous Vehicle Industry Association, National Alliance to Stop Impaired Driving, and Governors Highway Safety Association. 

Join NSF to help prevent drowsy driving by sharing the campaign’s message on social media using the hashtag #SleepFirst. NSF’s drowsy driving prevention resources are available on www.theNSF.org.

###

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org 

In an age where technology is advancing so rapidly, our lives have become more connected to devices than ever. Our daily routines are closely intertwined with smartphones and wearables, smart homes, and even smart vehicles. In this era of innovation, it is important to understand how these technological advancements can enhance two of the most critical aspects of our lives: healthy sleep and safe driving. 

Father and son navigating safety feature of a vehicle

User Technologies: Devices and Wearables

In today’s fast-paced world, it is critical to prioritize and make time for sleep. Wearable technology is increasingly becoming a tool for people to monitor and learn about their sleep. Smartwatches and fitness trackers can now provide valuable insights into the quantity, quality, and benefits of our sleep. In short, they hold promise to help us get enough of the quality sleep we need to be our Best Slept Self® and be alert and ready to perform.

Built into many wearables are advanced sleep-tracking features that can monitor heart rate, body movement, and environmental factors like room temperature. Users can quickly and easily access detailed sleep reports, personalized information, and insights about their sleep that empower them to make informed decisions about their sleep health and performance. Beyond tracking sleep, wearable devices can function as alarms and reminders, helping us establish more consistent and healthier sleep routines. Some of these same wearable functions might also be used to help users stay prepared and alert for high-stakes tasks, such as driving a motor vehicle. 

Vehicle-Based Technologies: Driver Assistance Systems

Modern vehicles are equipped with an array of innovations that can contribute to road safety. These systems aim to reduce the risk of crashes caused by either poor human choices or errors, which can often be worsened by poor sleep health and drowsiness. These advances continue to be an important tool in the effort to prevent impaired driving.

Features such as adaptive cruise control, lane departure warnings, and blind-spot monitoring systems help mitigate risks and unsafe driving behaviors. These vehicle enhancements provide timely alerts and corrective actions when necessary. Ultimately, these technologies work with the driver to help reduce the likelihood of drowsy driving crashes.

Evolving Mobility Platforms: Ride Hailing and Autonomous Vehicles

The modern transportation landscape is evolving rapidly. Ride-hailing services are increasingly common, with autonomous driving options seeing opportunities in new markets. As autonomous cars become more available to users through ride-hail apps, they can offer an efficient and safer alternative to impaired driving when someone hasn’t had enough quality sleep to drive alert. In these cases, by eliminating the presence of a drowsy driver behind the wheel, autonomous technology can potentially revolutionize road safety. These vehicles are equipped with advanced sensors that see 360 degrees around the vehicle at all times and artificial intelligence algorithms that never get drowsy and maintain alertness to improve safety throughout the journey.

Looking Ahead

In an era where technology is rapidly changing the way we live and travel, it remains essential to prioritize sleep health to help stay safe. Until safety features are universally accessible, getting an optimal amount of good quality sleep is the best way to prevent drowsy driving crashes. NSF recommends most adults get 7-9 hours of sleep per night. Even as technology advances, it’s important to remember the fundamental role healthy sleep has in keeping drivers alert and our roads safe for everyone.

Waymo self driving logo dark

This content was produced independently by the National Sleep Foundation and brought to you by Waymo, a sponsor of the 2023 Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® campaign. 

A message from our sponsor: Waymo’s mission is to make it safe and easy for people and things to get where they’re going. From moving people to moving goods, we’re using autonomous driving technology to get to new places.

Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Differences Between Adults
Reporting Sleeping Issues to Healthcare Providers

 

Washington, D.C. (October 11, 2023): New research published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health journal shows differences in sex, race, education, and other factors between adults at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who have and have not reported trouble sleeping to a healthcare provider.

Patient-level factors associated with the self-report of trouble sleeping to healthcare providers in adults at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (Orbell, Scott, Baniak, Chasens, Godzik, Jeon, Morris, and Luyster) analyzed data from over 2,000 individuals who were categorized as high risk for OSA.

Findings showed half of the sample never reported trouble sleeping to a healthcare provider. Those more likely to report sleeping issues were females, former smokers, had prediabetes or diabetes, and experienced OSA-related symptoms including snorting, gasping and/or breathing cessation during sleep as well as daytime sleepiness.

“Our work highlights particular groups of at-risk individuals, including men, Mexican American or non-Hispanic Asian people, and those with lower educational attainment, who may be less likely to have crucial conversations about sleep with their healthcare providers. What is also concerning is that people at risk for OSA who snore may not recognize this symptom as a reportable problem,” explained Staci Orbell, PhD, MSN, RN, the lead author on this work conducted at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing.

“Along the journey to improve our sleep health, self-care, and wellness, many people will seek the help of a healthcare provider. In those cases, two-way communication is critical,” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD. “NSF encourages the public to discuss any and all sleep issues they may be experiencing, and it’s important for healthcare providers to ask about sleep health and sleep problems, understanding there can be differences between patient groups about what they disclose.”

NSF is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. For more information about sleep health including information on sleep disorders, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

 

About Sleep Health®: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation

The landmark, award-winning, peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health publishes the latest studies on the cross-section of sleep’s role in population health and the social sciences from global, multidisciplinary perspectives. SleepHealthJournal.org

Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® 2023

Campaign Dates Announced

 

Washington, D.C. (October 4, 2023): Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announced Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® 2023 will be November 5-11. NSF encourages everyone to prioritize sleep and drive when alert and refreshed. NSF’s annual campaign goal is to help the public understand the risks of this form of impaired driving and reduce the number of drivers who choose to drive while sleep deprived. 

NSF data show 95 percent of Americans think drowsy driving is risky, but a majority of drivers do it anyway. Additionally, 6 in 10 drivers (62%) have driven a car when they were so tired that they had a hard time keeping their eyes open, a projected 150+ million US motorists. According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drowsy driving is responsible for more than 6,400 U.S. deaths annually. Fall-asleep crashes are often caused by not getting enough of the quality sleep you need. 

“Drowsy driving is impaired driving. It’s a risk to public health and safety that can impact anyone on our roads. NSF encourages all drivers to prioritize sleep and drive only when alert and refreshed,” said NSF CEO, John Lopos. “We can all do more to share or act on this message,” continued Lopos.

NSF independently produces Drowsy Driving Prevention Week and all related official educational content. NSF’s drowsy driving prevention resources are available on www.theNSF.org.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Washington, D.C. (September 13, 2023): New research published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health journal shows bedtime procrastination was associated with poorer sleep health.

The thief of (bed)time: Examination of the daily associations between bedtime procrastination and multidimensional sleep health (Carlson, Baron, Johnson, and Williams) analyzed sleep data from nearly 300 undergraduate students at a U.S.-based university. 

The authors explain bedtime procrastination is a common occurrence where sleep is delayed voluntarily in the absence of external obligations. Activities can include leisure activities like viewing social media or socializing with friends. Research findings showed that greater bedtime procrastination was associated with poorer self-reported sleep restoration, later sleep timing, less efficient sleep, and shorter sleep duration. 

“Our findings demonstrated that, regardless of whether you are a night owl or morning lark, procrastinating your bedtime disrupts sleep. In our study, bedtime procrastinators reported insomnia-like sleep patterns, but further research is needed to determine the role of this bedtime behavior in sleep disorders” explained Steven Carlson, MS, the primary author on this work.

“National Sleep Foundation is committed to translating science and research for the public to help anyone and everyone be their Best Slept Self®. Towards this goal, NSF encourages everyone to prioritize their sleep.  As reported in the study by Carlson and colleagues, when sleep is voluntarily postponed, people tend to sleep worse. One effective way to help prioritize sleep is through establishing a healthy sleep schedule.” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD.

Utilizing a personal wind-down routine in the evenings, which consists of relaxing activities like listening to calming music, meditation, or journaling can help signal that it’s time for your body to go to sleep. Along with a sleep-friendly environment that is dark, quiet, and cool, people can set themselves up for a good night’s sleep. NSF recommends putting away electronic devices an hour before bedtime to also help prevent bedtime distractions. 

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. For more information about sleep health, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

About Sleep Health®: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation

The landmark, award-winning, peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health publishes the latest studies on the cross-section of sleep’s role in population health and the social sciences from global, multidisciplinary perspectives. SleepHealthJournal.org

 

Media Contact:
Stephanie Kohn

540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

You probably know it’s important to get enough sleep each night, but did you know having a consistent sleep schedule, or going to bed and waking up at the same time, is also important for your health and well-being?

Positive Effects of a Regular Sleep Schedule

Having a regular sleep schedule can positively affect key areas in your life including your mental and physical health as well as performance. Getting enough sleep from a regular sleep schedule can make it easier for you to cope with daily stress and less likely to be impacted by minor negative things that can come up. Other positive benefits of a regular sleep schedule include alertness, health and safety behaviors, and improved heart health.

How Do I Set a Sleep Schedule?

If those positive health effects sound good to you (and they should!), you might be asking how you can take steps to have a more consistent sleep schedule. We recommend three steps that can specifically help you set and stick with a sleep schedule.

Prioritize your sleep

Sleep tends to be the first thing that gets sacrificed when life gets busy with work, school, or family commitments. When you value your sleep, maintaining a consistent sleep schedule can come more easily. The first step is to understand the benefits of getting enough quality sleep. By prioritizing sleep in your life, you’re setting yourself up to get enough sleep to help feel great and be at your best.

Use bedtime reminders and wake-up alarms

When it gets closer to your normal bedtime, use a reminder that alerts you it’s time to start your personal routine to get ready for sleep. In the morning, a wake-up alarm can help you get your day started without the worry of oversleeping.

Keep to your wind-down routine

Looking for something to help you fall asleep easier? A wind-down routine is a simple plan to let your mind and body prepare for sleep every night. Each person’s approach is different but could include relaxing activities like reading a book, meditating, journaling, or listening to calming music before bed. Staying consistent night after night leads to the best results.

What If I’m Not Getting Enough Sleep?

Most adults need between 7-9 hours of quality sleep a night to feel their best the next day. Here’s a fact: if you know you need eight hours of sleep at night to function your best and you are only getting six hours, you are building a sleep debt. The good news is there’s something you can do to help pay off that sleep debt. We’ve learned that sleeping an extra 1-2 hours on the weekends or “non-work days,” or taking short naps (as your schedule allows) can help most people start to offset the sleep debt they built up during the week. 

The take-home message is that following a consistent sleep schedule is important for overall health and wellness in the long run. If you need to make up for lost sleep, sleeping in a little on the weekends is one way to help you get enough of the quality sleep you need to be your Best Slept Self®.

Click to Download the Sleep Schedule Graphic

National Sleep Foundation Reinforces Consistent Sleep Schedules with New Consensus Guideline
Features evidence-based benefits for health and performance allows catch-up sleep on non-work days

Washington, D.C. (September 6, 2023): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) issued a new guideline emphasizing the benefit of consistent sleep schedules on health and performance. The results are from a consensus report published in Sleep Health®, the Journal of the National Sleep Foundation, under the original title The importance of sleep regularity: a consensus statement of the National Sleep Foundation sleep timing and variability panel.

The NSF advances the public’s knowledge, behaviors, and practices by issuing definitive guidelines and recommendations for sleep health. NSF established an expert panel of some of the foremost authorities in sleep and circadian science to develop a consensus recommendation for consistent sleep schedules, reflecting an extensive analysis of the peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

The multidisciplinary expert panel found that consistent sleep and wake times are important for mental and physical health as well as academic and cognitive performance. Inconsistent sleep schedules are associated with negative health outcomes including obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, immune dysfunction, cancer, and impaired mental health. Further, if sleep is insufficient on work days, sleeping an additional 1-2 hours a day (“catch-up sleep”) on non-work days can benefit most people as a method to help recover from sleep debt. 

“The Consensus Panel concluded that consistent timing of bedtimes and wake times are associated with improved outcomes across multiple dimensions of health and performance—including alertness, cardiovascular and metabolic health, inflammation and mental health,” said panel chair and senior author, Charles A. Czeisler, MD, PhD, Division Chief of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Frank Baldino, Jr., Ph.D. Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Sleep is necessary for life. Getting less than the NSF-recommended 7-9 hours of sleep per night, for most adults, and/or having poor sleep quality are associated with adverse health outcomes. “Translation of science to the public is core to the mission of the National Sleep Foundation. The findings in our consensus report reinforce important steps everyone can take to be their Best Slept Self®,” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD. “Maintaining consistent sleep and wake times and utilizing non-work days to help catch up on sleep are two tools most members of the public can use to promote sleep health.”

NSF thanks its international expert panel for conducting the literature review and analysis. Collectively, the panel reflects decades of clinical and research experience, more than 1,300 academic publications, and a Nobel laureate. Members from the expert panel are affiliated with the following institutions:

Read the full results and methodology of the report here. For more information about sleep health, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

Media Contact:
Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

Young-student-smiling-at-school

With children and teens heading back to school, it’s a good time to prioritize sleep as we adjust to new schedules. Good sleep health can help improve mood, attention, academic performance, and reduce stress.

Establish a Sleep and Wake Schedule:  Sleep and wake times may naturally drift during the summer months. Moving back to a regular sleep routine a week before school begins can help children and teens begin the school year well-rested. Shift bed and wake times by 10-15 minutes a day until you’re back on the schedule you want.

Setting consistent times for sleep and wake will help children and teens stick to a regular sleep schedule. Keep in mind that children and teens have different sleep needs:

Also, it’s helpful to consider that children’s biological sleep and wake time (sometimes called their chronotype) change with age. As children get older, their natural sleep/wake schedule will shift so they both get sleepy and wake up later. This normal shift to a later schedule is biological and reaches a peak in their early 20s.

Keeping these natural tendencies in mind can help to balance how long and when children need to sleep with their school start times. National Sleep Foundation recommends school not start for middle and high school students before 8:30 AM.

Model Good Habits: Help each of your family members be their Best Slept Self® by modeling good sleep habits during the day and night. It’s important that children and teens understand the importance of sleep for their health.

Watch this National Institutes of Health (NIH) Q&A with National Sleep Foundation Past Chair Dr. Lauren Hale on the science of sleep and teens. Dr. Hale’s presentation begins at 8:17.

Cover image from the Facebook Live Science of Sleep and Teens

Heading back to school can be an exciting time. As part of NSF’s Bright Schools® initiative, NSF is committed to adolescent health and educating school-aged children and their families about the natural sleep/wake process and the importance of sleep for health.

National Sleep Foundation Hosts Congressional Briefing on Sleep Health Equity

Washington, D.C. (July 27, 2023): Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) hosted the first Congressional briefing on sleep health equity. Members of Congress, staff, and interested stakeholders heard from an expert panel about the causes and consequences of sleep health disparities, steps needed to promote sleep health equity, and what Congress can do to accelerate this important work.

Sleep is necessary for life. Getting less than the NSF-recommended 7-9 hours of sleep per night, for most adults, and/or having poor sleep quality are associated with adverse health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, mental health conditions, and mortality. People from historically underserved communities in the U.S. are disproportionately affected by social determinants leading to increases in poor sleep health and sleep disorders. It is critical to understand the sources of racial/ethnic sleep health disparities and promote actionable solutions to achieve sleep health equity.

National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) mission is to improve the health and well-being of the public through sleep education and advocacy. This Congressional briefing convened expert panelists from across the country for an essential conversation on social determinants of sleep health, focusing on potential solutions.

“The National Sleep Foundation believes that everyone should have the same opportunity to be their Best Slept Self®. Understanding the sources of racial/ethnic sleep health disparities and promoting actionable solutions to eliminate them and achieve sleep health equity is critical to the NSF’s mission,” said NSF Chair Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, and featured speaker at the event.

NSF’s Congressional briefing complements other ongoing NSF activities to help support sleep health equity such as growing the body of published evidence through its journal Sleep Health, proactive diversity and inclusiveness in NSF program topics and participants, expanded design and analysis of NSF’s population health research, and other internal progress towards NSF’s position on sleep health equity.

Read the NSF’s Position Statement on Sleep Health Equity. For more information about sleep health, visit Sleep Health Topics

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

Media Contact:
Stephanie Kohn

540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Association Between Experiencing Discrimination and Poorer Sleep

 

Washington, D.C. (July 25, 2023): New research published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health journal shows experiencing discrimination is associated with poorer sleep. Discrimination is associated with higher anxiety and lower social well-being which are associated with poorer sleep.

A Longitudinal Examination of Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking Discrimination with Objective and Subjective Sleep (Dautovich, Reid, Ghose, Kim, Tighe, Shoji and Kliewer) analyzed longitudinal data from nearly 1,000 adults across the adult lifespan.

Findings showed that discrimination was associated with a broad array of sleep outcomes across a 10-year period. Anxiety and social well-being were linked to reports of experiencing discrimination and negative sleep outcomes.

“Our findings highlight the unfortunate durability of the association between discrimination and sleep, a critical pillar of well-being. These effects were heightened in those experiencing chronic or an increasing frequency of discrimination. Feeling socially disconnected or anxious, in association with experiences of discrimination, predicted worse sleep” explained Natalie Dautovich, PhD, the primary author on this work, and Environmental Fellow at National Sleep Foundation.

“The National Sleep Foundation is committed to sleep health equity. These investigators added to the body of evidence linking discrimination with sleep health, specifically identifying connections between perceived discrimination and both subjective and objective sleep characteristics—over a ten-year span. Their findings are an important reminder that sleep is very much influenced by the social world in which we live.” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD.

Read the NSF’s Position Statement on Sleep Health Equity. Register to attend an NSF-hosted Congressional Briefing Webinar on sleep health equity here. For more information about sleep health, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

About Sleep Health®: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation
The landmark, award-winning, peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health publishes the latest studies on the cross-section of sleep’s role in population health and the social sciences from global, multidisciplinary perspectives. SleepHealthJournal.org

Media Contact:
Stephanie Kohn

540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

 

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

 

Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Association Between Sleep Disorders and Relative Risk of Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts in Youth

 

Washington, D.C. (June 20, 2023): New research published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health journal show sleep disorders are associated with increased risk for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in youth presenting to emergency departments.

Sleep Disorders and Relative Risk of Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts in Youth Presenting to Emergency Departments (Carbone, Casement) analyzed data from more than 65 million youth aged 6-24 years who visited an emergency department between 2015 and 2017.

Findings showed that youth presenting to emergency departments with a diagnosed sleep disorder are at increased risk for having thoughts of suicide, or “suicidal ideation.” In fact, youth with at least one sleep disorder diagnosis had three times greater odds of an emergency department encounter involving suicidal ideation than those without a sleep disorder diagnosis. Results also showed that sleep disorders are underdiagnosed in youth presenting to emergency departments, relative to their estimated prevalence in the general population. 

Dr. Casement explained, “In this nationally representative sample of youth presenting to EDs, suicidal ideation was predicted by a sleep disorder diagnosis alone and when accounting for mental health diagnoses. Furthermore, youth with a sleep disorder and either a mood or psychotic disorder had greater risk for suicidal ideation than youth with only one of these disorders. Especially considering our finding that sleep disorders are underdiagnosed in youth presenting to EDs, these results highlight the potential benefit of enhanced screening for sleep disorders as a tool for suicide prevention.” 

“Sleep and mental health have an important and compelling connection, which has been part of our recent work at National Sleep Foundation. These investigators have added to the body of evidence about this relationship, specifically identifying the risk of suicidal ideation and attempt in adolescents who have a diagnosed sleep disorder. National Sleep Foundation is committed to helping all members of society, both young and older, with their sleep health—which, in turn, may yield valuable gains in mental wellness.” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD.

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. The NSF is committed to understanding the associations between sleep health characteristics and mental health in the general population and is especially focused on insights that may inform public health campaigns. For more information about sleep health and mental health, visit theNSF.org/sleep-health-topics

For anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts, please seek care. Seek care at your nearest emergency facility or, in the United States, contact the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline by calling or texting 988.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

About Sleep Health®: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation
The landmark, award-winning peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health publishes the latest studies on the cross-section of sleep’s role in population health and the social sciences from global, multidisciplinary perspectives. SleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

 

National Sleep Foundation Data Show Marked Decrease in Sleep Duration in US Adults Following Return from Pandemic Restrictions

 

Washington, D.C. (June 5, 2023): New data from the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Index® show a significant increase in the percentage of US adults who sleep less than the NSF-recommended 7-9 hours per night, as more restrictions were lifted during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

NSF has historically conceptualized sleep health as a combination of adequate sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep satisfaction, and not the mere absence of sleep disorders. NSF developed and validated the Sleep Health Index® (SHI) as a way to assess the population’s sleep health and has administered it annually since 2014.

NSF’s findings showed a 40% increase in the percentage of US adults who sleep less than 7-9 hours a night (45% in 2021 to 63% in 2022). Changes in pandemic-related restrictions, such as returning to in-person work, school, and social events, may be associated with the observed reductions in sleep duration across the population. The WHO declared the emergency phase of the global COVID-19 pandemic to be over in May 2023.

“This effect is certainly alarming. We are still learning from this unique historical period, and these results reinforce there’s more work for us and others to do to improve population sleep health in response to what we’ve seen.” said Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, Board Chair of the National Sleep Foundation.

“Building on NSF’s previous breaking report about sleep in US adults during the global pandemic, one of the first to share multi-year data, we specifically looked at how Americans’ sleep health began to change after more people’s routines began to normalize. It is striking that we observed a significant decrease in sleep duration as the nation returned to more normal, pre-pandemic operations. We continue to analyze our dataset for new observations and design research we can translate to help the public,” said NSF Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs, Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD.

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. The NSF is committed to helping anyone and everyone be their Best Slept Self®. For more information about sleep health, visit theNSF.org

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice. theNSF.org

Media Contact
Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org 

 

National Sleep Foundation Highlights Evidence in General US Population Connecting Sleep Health with Probable Depressive Disorder
Analysis shows link between sleep health and clinically relevant depression symptoms

Washington, D.C. (May 23, 2023): Today, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) highlighted additional findings from its 2023 Sleep in America® Poll, which previously demonstrated meaningful connections between Americans’ sleep health and their mental health and wellness. Among key findings were that nearly 1 in 5 (19%) US adults who sleep less than the NSF-recommended 7-9 hours per night meet criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis of a depressive disorder.

Released during the 25th anniversary of NSF’s Sleep Awareness Week®, this year’s poll uniquely co-administered three NSF sleep health assessments—Sleep Health Index®, Sleep Satisfaction Tool®, and Best Slept Self® Questionnaire—along with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), an established measure of symptoms of depression. Importantly, the PHQ-9 can be scored in a way to identify adults whose depression symptoms are consistent with a probable clinical depression disorder.  

Additional key results from the research showed:

“Where our initial focus was to help the public and policy-makers understand the very real connection between sleep health and depression symptoms in the general US population, we felt it was important to further highlight results that gave a clinically-relevant signal, such as we saw using the PHQ-9,” said Joseph Dzierzewski, PhD, Vice President of Research and Scientific Affairs at National Sleep Foundation. 

Sleep health is crucial to our overall health and well-being. As the United States continues to address the far-reaching effects of a national mental health crisis, this year’s Sleep in America Poll findings come at an important time and support the ongoing work of other leading public health and advocacy organizations including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), multiple divisions of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Psychological Association (APA), National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), and Mental Health America, among others who recognize mental health as a critical issue facing our nation today.

“These results go beyond just alerting people that sleep health and mental health are linked,” said David Neubauer, MD, a practicing psychiatrist and member of National Sleep Foundation’s Board of Directors. “The findings suggest there are cases where the connection between someone’s poor sleep and depression symptoms may be clinically meaningful and possibly have implications for their care.”

For more sleep health information and to learn ways to help be your Best Slept Self®, visit www.theNSF.org

If you’re still not getting the sleep you need after taking some basic steps, or if you have lasting symptoms, it’s a good idea to talk with your healthcare provider. That’s especially true if you are having challenges with your mood or feelings of depression. You are not alone. For anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts, please seek care. Contact the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline by calling or texting 988.

###

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practiceTheNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

About the Sleep in America® Poll

The Sleep in America Poll is the National Sleep Foundation’s premier annual review of current sleep topics. The Poll was first conducted in 1991 and has been produced since 2018 by Langer Research Associates. The full Sleep in America Poll findings, including methodology, can be found at theNSF.org/sleep-in-america-polls/.

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Announces Sleep Awareness Week® 2022 Dates

 

Washington, D.C. (February 18, 2022): National Sleep Foundation has announced its annual Sleep Awareness Week® 2022 will take place from March 13-19, with a call to action for everyone to recognize the importance of sleep as a crucial measure of their overall health.

Established in 1998 by the National Sleep Foundation, Sleep Awareness Week is recognized annually as the premier awareness and education campaign for sleep, when the National Sleep Foundation engages the public to prioritize sleep as a crucial measure of their overall health and well-being.  Sleep Awareness Week promotes best practices for sleep health that include expert guidance and practical tips to help people get the sleep they need. Campaign materials and activities are found at the Sleep Awareness Week 2022 site. 

Sleep Awareness Week begins on March 13 at the start of Daylight Saving Time, when most Americans change their clocks and lose an hour of sleep. During the week, NSF also releases results of the hallmark Sleep in America® Poll, now in its 24th year of surveying Americans on a range of sleep-related topics.

“National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Awareness Week is a cornerstone program that’s part of our work to help the public be their Best Slept Self™,” says National Sleep Foundation CEO John Lopos. “Healthy sleep can be achieved through actions we take during the day and at night to ensure we get enough quality sleep to be at our best.”

Sleep Awareness Week 2022 is supported by unrestricted funds from Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Eisai, Inc., Huckleberry, Avadel Pharmaceuticals, PureCare, Apnimed, and Harmony Biosciences. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Safety Council are helping to promote NSF’s healthy sleep messages. NSF independently produces Sleep Awareness Week, the Sleep in America Poll, and all related official educational content. Sleep health resources for the public are available at www.TheNSF.org.  

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.

TheNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Health Journal Publishes Special Issue on Sleep in the Family System

 

Washington, D.C. (February 16, 2022): The National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Health journal has published a special issue to highlight the central role of sleep in key aspects of family life, spanning individual functioning, relationship quality, and overall family health. 

“We’re pleased that Drs. Douglas Teti, Liat Tikotzky and Helen Ball served as Co-Editors of this special issue and lent their expert perspectives,” said Dr. Orfeu Buxton, Editor-in-Chief of Sleep Health. This issue highlights the importance of understanding the intricate and significant ways sleep can interact with environmental and cultural factors to affect all members and facets of the family system.

“Sleep in children is intricately embedded in the overall family system.  It can affect and be affected by parent cognitions, parent-child interactions and relationships, and the manner in which parents structure sleep and prepare children for it,” said Dr. Douglas Teti, Department Head and Distinguished Professor, Human Development and Family Studies, at The Pennsylvania State University and Sleep Health Associate Editor. Along with Dr. Teti, Dr. Liat Tikotzky, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology at Ben-Gurion University (Israel), and Dr. Helen Ball, Director of Durham Infancy & Sleep Centre at the Durham University (UK), edited the special issue and authored its editorial, which provides an overview of the articles in the issue.

The National Sleep Foundation is committed to publishing research that identifies ways to advance sleep health across all populations. The special issue can be accessed on the Sleep Health Journal website at SleepHealthJournal.org. 

On February 23, 2022, Drs. Teti, Tikotzky, and Ball will host a live webinar titled “Sleep in the Family System” with select authors of articles featured in the special issue. For more information and to register, visit the Sleep Health Journal website. 

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice.
TheNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Journal Publishes Special Issue to Help Advance Sleep Health

Washington, D.C. (February 7, 2022): The National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Journal has published a special issue as part of its efforts towards sleep health equity. The online issue represents a guiding framework for understanding the critical intersections of race-ethnicity, income, education, and other social determinants that contribute to the well-documented racial-ethnic disparities in sleep health in the U.S.

“It’s time to move the needle forward beyond the individual and shed light on the socio-political contexts that perpetuate disparities in sleep health across racial-ethnic groups in the U.S. The studies in this special issue highlight the science of sleep health as a powerful social justice tool that can be leveraged to promote sleep health equity within our society. #NoJusticeNoSleep”, said Royette Dubar, PhD, Assistant Professor at Wesleyan University and Associate Editor of Sleep Health. Dubar authored the special issue’s editorial which provides an overview of the landscape of sleep health disparities and introduces the articles in the issue.

“The National Sleep Foundation is committed to publishing research that identifies ways to advance sleep health across all populations. By identifying opportunities for additional research and giving a platform for it to be shared amongst the field, is one way NSF commits to moving the needle on eradicating sleep health disparities,” said  Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, NSF Board Member and Chair of NSF’s Sleep Health Equity Task Force.

The studies in this collection provide important insight for efforts to improve sleep health equity. Manuscripts will be added over time, and articles will be open access for several months after they are added. For more information, read the editorial here and learn more about NSF’s Statement on Equality and the Need for Change.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.

TheNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release
Contact: Stephanie Kohn
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Publishes Position Statement on Sleep Health Equity

Washington, D.C. (January 27, 2022): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) has released its Sleep Health Equity Position Statement. As part of the NSF’s mission to improve the public’s health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy, it is critical to understand the sources of racial/ethnic sleep health disparities and promote actionable solutions to eliminate them and achieve sleep heath equity.

People of color in the U.S. are disproportionately affected by poor sleep health and sleep disorders. The NSF Position Statement outlines key strategic changes needed to achieve sleep health equity, including: expanding evidence-based and culturally-sensitive sleep health resources, improving equitable access to clinical sleep healthcare, and addressing sleep health equity across the continuum of sleep health care delivery. Other strategic focuses include funding research and policy actions.

“Racial and ethnic disparities in sleep health are a major public health problem. Sleep health equity can be achieved through public investment in resources, education and training, as well as system- and policy-level changes,” said Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, NSF Board Member and Chair of NSF’s Sleep Health Equity Task Force. “Identifying and understanding the barriers to sleep health equity is imperative as we ultimately aim to propose and support efforts to improve the lives of underrepresented Americans by optimizing sleep health.”

As a leader in sleep health, NSF will continue to focus on actionable solutions for underserved and underrepresented communities that help ensure everyone has the opportunity to get the sleep we all need. For more information, read the Position Statement on Sleep Health Equity.

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: Stephanie Kohn
703-243-1753
skohn@thensf.org

 

Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Importance of Later School Start Times for Adolescent Health

 

Washington, D.C. (January 4, 2022): The latest article published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Journal highlights the importance of later school start times for adolescents. 

Adolescent sleep health and school start times: Setting the research agenda for California and beyond—a research summit summary (Ziporyn, Owens, Wahlstrom, Wolfson, Troxel, Saletin, Rubens, Pelayo, Payne, Hale, Keller, and Carskadon) highlights key outcomes from the Summit on Adolescent Sleep and School Start Times held in January 2021 and hosted by Stanford University School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. National Sleep Foundation supported the Summit, along with other sleep organizations and universities.

Sleep and circadian researchers at the Summit summarized the extensive body of research on adolescent sleep and school start time change, identifying innovative research areas and pressing questions that might be informed by California’s groundbreaking 2019 law requiring middle schools to start at 8:00 AM or later and high schools to start at 8:30 AM or later. 

“Simply put, later school start times improve adolescent sleep, health, safety, and learning,” said Lauren Hale, PhD, article co-author and National Sleep Foundation Board Chair. “Moving forward, we need to identify the most effective ways to build school health policies that support student sleep, as well as educate the wider school community.”

Community-engaged sleep research using a multi-disciplinary approach is required to support school and community leaders delaying school start times. “This research is critical in helping to inform school and workplace policies that support the basic human right for quality sleep for all stakeholders,” said Rafael Pelayo, MD, article co-author and National Sleep Foundation Board member.

“The National Sleep Foundation is committed to improving adolescent sleep health and applauds the efforts of the research community studying the effects of school start time changes,” concluded Hale.

The paper’s conclusions support NSF’s Sleep Healthy Policy Statement on healthy adolescent school start times, including its recommendations for research and policy efforts to help communities move to school schedules that allow students an opportunity to get healthy sleep.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.

theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

The National Sleep Foundation Says “Happy Holidays” Means Being Your Best Slept Self™
Foundation Issues Tips During the Holiday Season for Healthy Sleep Despite Changes in Routines and Travel Plans   

 

Washington, DC (December 23, 2021): This holiday season, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is providing tips to help Americans prioritize their sleep to improve overall health and wellness. During the holidays, routines change, and sleep schedules can be disrupted. With children and teens home from school, fewer hours of daylight, less time spent outside, and new sleep environments due to travel, it can be challenging to sleep well over the holidays.  

Getting enough quality sleep is essential at every age and plays a vital role in strengthening immune system function and fighting illness. With today’s heavy focus on health, it’s the time of year when maintaining a healthy immune system is top of mind.

“Amid the holiday hustle and bustle, the regular cold and flu season, and ongoing concerns about COVID-19, now more than ever is it important to ensure we’re all getting the right amount of sleep,” said Lauren Hale, PhD, Chair of the National Sleep Foundation. “No matter where or how you celebrate the holidays, there are things you can do to be your Best Slept Self. At the National Sleep Foundation, we understand how disrupting the holiday season can be for sleep schedules, so we’re sharing our easy-to-follow tips to put better sleep at the top of the list of holiday gifts and New Year’s Resolutions.”

The NSF offers the following tips to make sure you sleep well this holiday season and beyond:

For more information and tips on how to maintain proper sleep habits, visit www.thensf.org

 

###

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.

theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

 

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
703-243-1753
skohn@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Textbook for Public Health Professionals Expands Sleep Health Focus

 

Washington, DC (December 14, 2021): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) has published Foundations of Sleep Health, its first sleep health textbook. This new resource provides a historic and current overview of the state of sleep health, with an emphasis on the interaction between several levels of determinants and factors that influence sleep health.

“This new reference can help inform a broad audience in public health by sharing some of the latest research and principles of sleep health in a different context,” said Lauren Hale, PhD, Board Chair of the National Sleep Foundation. “Foundations of Sleep Health uses a distinct framework to present evidence supporting our current knowledge and highlights important factors that both contribute to and are impacted by our sleep,” added Hale.

Foundations of Sleep Health continues NSF’s work leading international, multidisciplinary expert groups to develop and deliver evidence-based resources including sleep health consensus guidelines and recommendations, standards in sleep technology, position and policy statements, and its peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health.

“Sleep is crucial to our health and well-being,” said John Lopos, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation. “NSF conceived of Foundations of Sleep Health to share our expertise and unique perspective in sleep health and engage broader audiences in our longstanding mission. The insightful editorial leadership of Drs. Javier Nieto and Donna Petersen as well as all of the distinguished expert contributors made this vision for sleep and public health come to life.” added Lopos.

“We were pleased to join NSF as the co-editors of Foundations of Sleep Health,” said Dr. Javier Nieto. “NSF is a major force in the sleep health field and we are proud to have contributed to this resource which expands the focus on sleep in public health,” added Dr. Donna Petersen.

For more than 30 years, NSF has educated the public on the importance of sleep health in relation to overall health and well-being. NSF has published consensus papers and guidelines for positive sleep health. For more information about National Sleep Foundation, visit www.theNSF.org.

Foundations of Sleep Health is available for purchase in paperback and e-book.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well- being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.

theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

During the holidays, the whole family’s routine can change. Children and teens are home from school, there are fewer hours of daylight, and families travel to visit loved ones. The changing weather can also make it more difficult to spend time outdoors and exercise. With all these changes, one thing should stay constant: healthy sleep habits.

Whether you spend the holidays at your home or away, there are things you can do this season to be your Best Slept Self™.

An infographic with tips on sleeping well during the holidays
  • Set a sleep schedule. Wake up and go to bed at the same time every day, even on the weekends. Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep each night and children and teens need 8-11 hours.
  • Make a sleep-friendly bedroom. Sleep in a darkened, quiet room and keep the room temperature between 60 to 67 degrees. You might also need to change your sheets or blankets to fit the weather.
  • Maintain healthy habits. Spend some time outside each day to get sunlight exposure. Exercising can also promote better sleep. Finish eating and drinking 2-3 hours before you go to bed.

Celebrate sleep this holiday season by practicing healthy sleep habits with the whole family!

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
703-243-1753
skohn@thensf.org   

 

Kokoon Wins National Sleep Foundation 2021 SleepTech® Award

Washington, D.C. (December 7, 2021): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) named Kokoon’s Nightbuds as the winner of the 2021 SleepTech® Award. NSF’s SleepTech Award recognizes the year’s most innovative efforts in advancing sleep technology, and is a feature of NSF’s ongoing work to encourage and celebrate efforts by which sleep science and insight are rapidly incorporated into accessible health products and services.

“We congratulate Kokoon for winning our 2021 SleepTech Award. Their approach combines elements of sleep science and technology into an innovative product experience,” said John Lopos, CEO of NSF. 

Kokoon’s Nightbuds use a PPG sensor to collect heart rate variability and motion data within a companion app. These data are processed to automatically adjust and adapt the Nightbuds’ audio levels to the user’s stage of sleep in real time. Kokoon also described Nightbuds sleep earbuds as including dynamic noise masking, audio streaming, and sleep monitoring throughout the night.

“We’re honored to win the 2021 SleepTech Award from the National Sleep Foundation for our Nightbuds product and to be recognized for advancing consumer sleep technology. At Kokoon we are passionate about making sleep science more accessible and convenient for all. We are proud to offer our innovations in comfort and the application of sleep data to personalize the listening experience to the individual” Tim Antos, CEO & Co-Founder, Kokoon Technology. 

The NSF would also like to acknowledge two SleepTech Award semi-finalists: EnsoData and SleepSpace. EnsoData’s EnsoSleep is an FDA cleared Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology solution that analyzes and scores sleep studies to support clinicians in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating patients. SleepSpace is an operating system that connects with major wearable and smart bedroom appliances. 

Lloyd Sommers, General Manager of ReST (Responsive Surface Technologies) who was a judge and previous SleepTech Award winner, expressed his congratulations to Kokoon, “I was impressed by Kokoon’s commitment to usability. By adding sleep monitoring and user-data to deliver tailored insights and guidance, Nightbuds offer something unique that may help people with their sleep.”

The National Sleep Foundation has no financial relationship with any of the 2021 SleepTech Award contestants. 

 

About the National Sleep Foundation: The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

For Immediate Release
Contact: NSF Communications
703-243-1753
skohn@thensf.org

Congressional Resolution 778 Supports the Designation of Drowsy Driving Prevention Week

 

Washington, DC (November 22, 2021): Representatives Madeleine Dean and Brian Fitzpatrick, both of Pennsylvania, and André Carson, of Indiana, introduced House Resolution 778 in the U.S. House of Representatives. Developed by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) and with additional data and statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, the resolution supports the designation of “Drowsy Driving Prevention Week” to raise awareness about the dangers of drowsy driving and encourages people across the United States to take steps to prevent against drowsy driving.

NSF is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice. NSF created Drowsy Driving Prevention Week®, which occurs during the end of Daylight Saving Time, to raise awareness on the relatable experience of driving while drowsy. Drowsy driving is dangerously common, but preventable. An NSF survey of adult drivers found that 60% reported driving while drowsy in the past year, and the percentage of adults aged 18 and over who said they had fallen asleep while driving in the past 30 days translates to more than 10.3 million people. 100,000 police-reported crashes each year are caused by fatigued drivers, resulting in conservative estimates of 6,400 fatalities and 71,000 injuries. 

“NSF applauds Congress for recognizing Drowsy Driving Prevention Week. Drowsy driving is a public health concern that everyone can take steps to prevent.” said John Lopos, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation. “All drivers and passengers should be on the lookout for drowsy driving. Before you get behind the wheel, take a moment to assess your alertness and energy levels. If you feel sleepy, you probably aren’t alert enough to drive.” added Lopos.

“Drowsy Driving Prevention Week will raise awareness and educate people on preventable measures that will save lives,” Rep. Dean said. “Too many lives have been lost already to drowsy driving. We must make our roads safer for everyone.”

For over 30 years, NSF has educated the public on the importance of sleep health in relation to overall health and well-being. NSF has published consensus papers and guidelines for positive sleep health as well as easy-to-use tools and tips to improve sleep. For more information about National Sleep Foundation and Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, visit www.theNSF.org

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.org │SleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: NSF Communications
540-850-7827
skohn@thensf.org

Sleep first. Drive alert. Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® 2021

 

WASHINGTON, DC, November 5, 2021 — The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) announces November 7- 14 as Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® for 2021.

Drowsy Driving Prevention Week® is a time to reflect on how dangerously common—but preventable—drowsy driving truly is. Drowsy driving can be avoided. The most important preventative measure to stopping drowsy driving is a well-rested driver.

Drowsy driving is responsible for more than 6,400 U.S. deaths annually and is a public health concern. Younger drivers aged 16-25 are at greatest risk of falling asleep at the wheel, but almost everyone can relate to a time when they have nodded off behind the wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 100,000 police reported crashes each year are caused primarily by drowsy driving and that such crashes result in more than 71,000 injuries and $12.5 million in monetary losses. Most importantly, drowsy driving is preventable. NSF’s annual campaign goal is to reduce the number of drivers who drive while sleep deprived.

“Drowsy driving is a public health issue that can affect everyone. NSF encourages all drivers to prioritize sleep and drive only when alert and refreshed,” said NSF Chair, Lauren Hale, PhD.

The NSF Drowsy Driving Consensus Working Group’s 2016 report published in Sleep Health concluded that sleep deprivation renders motorists unfit to drive a motor vehicle. 1 Specifically, healthy drivers who have slept for two hours or less in the preceding 24 hours are not fit to operate a motor vehicle. NSF experts further agreed that most healthy drivers would likely be impaired with only 3 to 5 hours of sleep during the prior 24 hours.

Join NSF to help prevent drowsy driving. Access educational resources today on theNSF.org and share the campaign’s message on social media using the hashtag #SleepFirst.

NSF is proud to recognize Jack Cooper, Schneider National, and Waymo as Drowsy Driving Prevention Week sponsors and demonstrating their commitment to sleep health and road safety. We’re also pleased that the Drowsy Driving Prevention Project and National Safety Council are joining NSF to help educate the public about the dangers of drowsy driving.

 

References
1. National Sleep Foundation. Drowsy Driving Consensus Workgroup. Nov. 2015. Czeisler, CA, Wickwire, EM, Barger LK, et al. Sleep-deprived motor vehicle operators are unfit to drive: a multidisciplinary expert consensus statement on drowsy driving. Sleep Health. 2016;2(2):94-99.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

SleepFirst™: National Sleep Foundation’s Drowsy Driving Safety Campaign

 

Teenagers are at High Risk for Drowsy Driving Incidents

Any driver can become fatigued behind the wheel, but males under the age of 26 are in the highest risk group for driving drowsy. Drowsy driving can happen at any time, but it is most likely to occur between midnight and 6 am. It is important to inform yourself with the statistics, scenarios and the risk factors for drowsy driving. 

The National Sleep Foundation advises that teens need between 8 and 10 hours of sleep per night. Less sleep can be a contributing factor to Drowsy Driving.

College students walking together outdoors

Is Your Teen Driving Drowsy? 

Perhaps it is 6 am and your child is getting ready to get in the car and head to school. They have been up until 1am studying for their history exam. 

Or maybe it’s midnight and your high school senior has gone out for pizza after the football game. They text you to let you know that they are on their way home. 

You probably remind them to put their phone away while driving. You probably make sure that they are not driving under the influence. Make sure you also ask them if they are alert enough to drive. While parents are apt to concern themselves with making sure their teenager does not drive under the influence or drive distracted, it is equally important to make sure that they are alert enough to get behind the wheel.   

Drowsy Driving vs. Driving Under the Influence

Drunk driving and drowsy driving are both extremely dangerous and responsible for a high number of vehicle crashes and fatalities each year. The consensus across traffic safety, and scientific and public health communities is that it is difficult to quantify the true number of car crashes caused by drowsy driving. A conservative estimate is  6,400 fatalities a year from drowsy driving. 

It is easier to quantify the number of car crashes caused by drunk driving than by drowsy driving. It is considered alcohol-impaired driving by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) when one or more drivers has a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of .08 or higher. NHTSA reported drunk driving was responsible for 9,236 fatal crashes in 2019. 

A clinical trial found that being awake for 17- 19 hours is comparable to having a blood alcohol content of 0.05%. Observations included decreased reaction time and hand-eye coordination. After longer periods without sleep, performance reached levels equivalent to a BAC of 0.1%.

Don’t Drive Drowsy or Drunk: Stay Safe While Driving

You can prevent drunk driving simply by not driving after consuming alcohol. Use a designated driver or a ride service. The best way to prevent drowsy driving is to get enough sleep. You can also use a ride service or ask someone else to drive if you do not feel alert. 

If you do notice signs of drowsiness, pull over and take a 20 minute nap. Signs of drowsy driving are similar to signs of drunk driving and include:

Avoiding both drunk driving and drowsy driving keeps everyone on the road safer and can reduce car crashes and fatalities.

SleepFirst™: National Sleep Foundation’s Drowsy Driving Safety Campaign

 

What Exactly is Microsleep?

You may be unfamiliar with the term, but microsleep is quite common and can be dangerous if it occurs while you are driving a vehicle.  

Simply put, microsleep is when you fall asleep for a period of several seconds. As the name implies, microsleep occurs so quickly that people who have an episode might not even realize they have fallen asleep. Microsleep can occur at any time of day, not just at night. During an episode, you may appear to be awake, and even have your eyes open, but your brain does not process information. 

Why is Microsleep Dangerous?

If you are sleep deprived, or if you have a sleep disorder, you are at higher risk for microsleep. Episodes can happen while you are driving a vehicle or operating other heavy machinery and this is when microsleep becomes precarious. Microsleep can lead to dangerous crashes, or running your car off of the road. If you are driving at a high speed, the likelihood of a severe crash increases. 

It is important that you make sure that you are alert before you get behind the wheel. If you feel drowsy, do not drive. If you find yourself with wandering thoughts, drifting into other lanes, or cannot remember the last few miles you drove, pull over to the side of the road to rest or ask someone else to drive. 

Preventing Microsleep

The best way to prevent microsleep is prioritizing sleep and making sure you get the right amount of sleep you need to feel refreshed and alert . The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-9 hours a night for adults, more for teenagers.  

You can also use the following techniques to better help you fall asleep at night. 

  1. Make sure to turn off electronics one hour prior to bed—no texting! 
  2. Set a relaxing bedtime routine, such as listening to calming music, reading a book or taking a warm bath. 
  3. Avoid caffeine in the late afternoon and evening. 
  4. If you are able, make sure to sleep in a cool, dark room.

For more information about drowsy driving, visit the Drowsy Driving Prevention Week ®  section of our website to learn more.

Daylight Saving Time: Spring Forward, Fall Back

 

In most of the United States, Daylight Saving time starts on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November. When you “spring forward” in March, clocks are set ahead by one hour at 2 am. When you “fall back” in November, clocks are set back by one hour at 2 am.

While the US Department of Transportation governs the use of Daylight Saving Time, states and territories (such as Arizona) can choose not to participate.Can Hypnosis Help with REM Sleep

Even though the clock change is just an hour, it can affect your sleep and cause sleep disruptions and with that comes associated issues and dangers. The clock change is linked to public health and safety risks, including increased risk of heart attacks, mood disorders, and car crashes. For this reason, the National Sleep Foundation recommends  that seasonal time changes and Daylight Saving Time should be eliminated in favor of a national standard time. 

Why Does the Clock Change Impact Sleep?

You might be wondering why the clock change has such a severe impact on your sleep. When your sleep-wake schedule is shifted, as in the case with the clock change, your circadian rhythm is severely impacted. Circadian rhythms follow a 24-hour cycle. They are physical, mental, and behavioral processes that respond primarily to light and dark. One simple and relatable example of a light-related circadian rhythm is the typical fashion in which humans sleep at night and are awake during the day.  

Our Roadways and the Clock Change

Drowsy driving is dangerous driving. A lack of sleep, caused by a time change, can affect thinking, decision-making, and alertness. As such, the number of car crashes spikes each year after Daylight Saving Time.

 

Whether you are driving a long or a short distance, be extra cautious when driving the week after a time change. First and foremost, always make sure you are alert before getting behind the wheel. If you feel sleep deprived, consider alternate modes of transportation. If you notice that you are drowsy while driving, pull over and take action. You could grab a 20 minute nap or drink a caffeinated beverage. Frequent blinking, heavy eyelids, drifting thoughts, and repeated yawning are all signs of drowsiness and that it is time to pull over. 

What Can I Do to Prepare for the Clock Change?

The dates of the clock change are available to view online for future years, allowing you to plan ahead. Here are some simple steps to promote better sleep and prepare yourself for a clock change. 

The National Sleep Foundation holds Drowsy Driving Prevention Week ®  (DDPW) each year the week following the end of Daylight Saving Time.

Contact: Stephanie Corkett
703-243-1753
scorkett@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation Joins Forces to Raise Awareness on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Washington, D.C. (October 19, 2021): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) has joined with the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), specialty medical societies, and patient-focused alliances to raise awareness and provide education on obstructive sleep apnea though a grant awarded to AASM by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“In our work to educate the public about the importance of sleep to their health and wellbeing, NSF continues to be a resource across many facets of sleep health. Sleep apnea poses a significant public health burden, so we continue doing our part to help improve the health and wellness of people who may be living with an undiagnosed sleep disorder,” said Dr. Lauren Hale, National Sleep Foundation Chair of the Board.

As part of the three-year project, AASM with its key partner the Sleep Research Society (SRS) also has engaged Alliance of Sleep Apnea Partners, American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, American College of Chest Physicians, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the American Thoracic Society.

“Our congratulations to AASM for receiving this grant to help people who ultimately may need and benefit from clinical care for sleep apnea. This is a great example of strength in numbers and NSF looks to lend our unique expertise and perspective to an important project,” said John Lopos, National Sleep Foundation CEO.

For more information from NSF about sleep health, visit Sleep Health Topics.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: Stephanie Corkett
703-243-1753
scorkett@thensf.org

Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Association between Poor Sleep and Physical Function in Black Older Adults with Disabilities

Washington, D.C. (October 5, 2021): New research findings published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Journal show that poor sleep was associated with poor physical function among low-income, predominantly Black older adults with disabilities.

Objectively Measured Sleep and Physical Function: Associations in Low-Income Older Adults with Disabilities (Okoye, Szanton, Perrin, Nkimbeng, Schrack, Han, Nyhuis, Wanigatunga, and Spira) analyzed data on nighttime sleep duration and wake after sleep onset (WASO) – time spent awake after initially falling asleep– from a population of low-income, predominantly Black individuals with disabilities. The study was designed to investigate whether poor sleep was associated with lower levels of physical performance and greater difficulty completing self-care activities such as bathing and dressing, and/or household activities such as grocery shopping and preparing meals.

Findings showed greater wakefulness during the night was associated with poorer physical performance and greater difficulty completing household activities.

“Given the disparities in sleep and disability in low-income and Black older adults, and the costs of caring for low-income older adults with disabilities, it is critical to study sleep health in this under-studied population.” said senior author, Adam P. Spira, PhD, a professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School’s Department of Mental Health. “It is becoming clear that sleep is closely related to social determinants of health, such as insufficient incomes and racial discrimination. This has important implications for studying how social factors impact health and function as we age.” added Safiyyah Maryam Okoye, PhD, MSN, a post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing.

NSF’s Sleep Health Journal is a rigorous source of information and insight that aims to help solve racial and other disparities that exist in sleep health and well-being. For more information about sleep health, visit Sleep Health Topics.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: NSF Communications
540-850-7827
scorkett@thensf.org

 

National Sleep Foundation Announces New Board of Directors
Lauren Hale Elected as Chair

 

Washington, D.C. (July 01, 2021): Effective July 1, Lauren Hale, PhD, Professor of Family, Population and Preventative Medicine in the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University will serve as Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Sleep Foundation (NSF). As Chair of the National Sleep Foundation, Dr. Hale will lead a Board of Directors composed of clinicians, researchers, and business professionals.

 

“I am deeply honored to assume the role of Chair during this exciting time. For over 30 years, NSF has been at the forefront of helping the public understand and adopt good sleep health practices into their daily lives. We continue to advance sleep health through our active involvement in and promotion of research, and we are setting our eyes on making an even greater impact on public health through our regular work with a diverse range of sleep health stakeholders. I’m grateful to be working with a dynamic team of people to help NSF achieve our goals,” said Hale. 

 

“Dr. Hale’s background in sleep health, the social determinants of health, and vulnerable populations will help NSF strengthen and expand our perspectives and partnerships as we execute our mission,” said John Lopos, National Sleep Foundation CEO. “Lauren has been a key member of the NSF board, and as the Founding Editor-In-Chief of Sleep Health was instrumental to the success of our journal,” continued Lopos.

 

Also starting July 1, Thomas DiSalvi, CDS, will serve as Vice Chair. DiSalvi is Vice President of Safety and Loss Prevention at Schneider National, Inc. Benjamin Gerson, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, will serve as Treasurer, and David N. Neubauer, MD, Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center, will serve as Secretary. Temitayo Oyegbile-Chidi, MD, PhD, University of California, Davis, will serve as an At-Large member of the Executive Committee. Additionally, Nana Duncan, Founder and Principal of the Thatcher Duncan Group, will now serve on the Board of Directors.

 

NSF expresses its gratitude to Richard K. Bogan, MD, who has completed his second term as NSF Chair.  Dr. Bogan is the President of Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC, and a Medical Officer of SleepMed, Inc. NSF thanks Dr. Bogan for his years of service to NSF and his continued support of NSF’s mission.

 

Visit www.thensf.org for sleep health information and a full list of the National Sleep Foundation’s Board of Directors.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: Stephanie Corkett
703-243-1753
scorkett@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Health Journal Receives Impact Factor

Sleep Health Receives a 4.450

Washington, D.C. (July 1, 2021): The National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Journal has received a 2020 Impact Factor of 4.450. This is the first time the Journal was included in Clarivate’s annual Journal Citation Reports, and the decision to include it further cements Sleep Health’s role as a high-quality source of information in sleep health and research.

Sleep Health grew in published output, impact and citations reflecting a prominent relevance across the sleep research and health fields. “We’re proud that Sleep Health continues to be an indispensable resource for sleep researchers,” said Orfeu Buxton, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Sleep Health. “Our authors, peer reviewers and editors deserve tremendous credit for their contributions to sleep research. The increases we’ve observed in our Journal’s citations and impact are due to the remarkable growth in output and readership that would not have been possible without their hard work and dedication.”

“The Journal’s high Impact Factor is a testament to how it is helping to connect sleep researchers and public health scholars from all over the world to work together to advance sleep health. The Journal has helped strengthen the connections between the sleep research and public health communities,” said Lauren Hale, PhD, Chair of the National Sleep Foundation.

For more information about Sleep Health, visit www.sleephealthjournal.org

 

About Sleep Health

Sleep Health Journal of the National Sleep Foundation is a multidisciplinary journal that explores sleep’s role in population health and elucidates the social science perspective on sleep and health. Aligned with the National Sleep Foundation’s global authoritative, evidence-based voice for sleep health, the journal serves as the foremost publication for manuscripts that advance the sleep health of all members of society. The scope of the journal extends across diverse sleep-related fields, including anthropology, education, health services research, human development, international health, law, mental health, nursing, nutrition, psychology, public health, public policy, fatigue management, transportation, social work, and sociology. The journal welcomes original research articles, review articles, brief reports, special articles, letters to the editor, editorials, and commentaries.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Contact: NSF Communications
540-850-7827
scorkett@thensf.org

 

National Sleep Foundation Endorses AASM’s New Position Statement on Sleep and Health

 

Washington, D.C. (June 18, 2021): The National Sleep Foundation (NSF), in keeping with its longstanding public mission to advance sleep health through education and advocacy, has endorsed the American Academy of Sleep Medicine’s (AASM) new position statement on sleep and health. Founded in 1990, NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research, and practice.

“Our sleep can affect every aspect of our lives, including our overall health and well-being,” said Lauren Hale, PhD, incoming Chair of the National Sleep Foundation board of directors. “The NSF remains driven to educate the public about that connection, and we applaud our colleagues at AASM for publishing this important statement.” added Hale.

In its peer-reviewed journal Sleep Health, NSF has published consensus guidelines on sleep duration, sleep quality, sleep satisfaction, and drowsy driving, along with a diverse range of contemporary research in sleep and public health. NSF also continues to develop easy-to-use content with tools and tips for the public, such as Making Time for SLEEP, and Sleep, Immune Function, and Vaccination that were released during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

“For more than 30 years this promise has been central to our mission and has informed our work to help people achieve healthy sleep,” said John Lopos, National Sleep Foundation CEO. “These are exciting times for us and for our colleagues in the broader sleep community to keep elevating the evergreen importance sleep has in people’s ability to thrive.” added Lopos.

To help improve your sleep and learn how sleep can lead to better health and well-being, visit www.thensf.org.

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org

Woman-in-field-of-flowers-sleep-and-supplements

Are you considering adding a sleep aid like melatonin to your nighttime routine? Here’s what to know about supplements and sleep.

Sleeping pills and prescription medications are sometimes used as treatments for poor sleep. Dietary supplement sleep aids, such as melatonin, are also a potential remedy that don’t require waiting for a prescription. Although most supplement sleep aids are readily available in stores, it’s important to speak with a healthcare professional beforehand about risk factors and potential side effects.

Common dietary supplements marketed as sleep aids include melatonin and valerian root, along with dozens of other possible ingredients, such as chamomile and magnesium. Learn more about sleep aids and how they work.

Be aware that in the United States dietary supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration for their effectiveness or safety.

Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone produced naturally in the body that works with the circadian rhythm to induce drowsiness as our natural bedtime approaches. The day-night cycle influences the timing of our biological clock so that we produce little melatonin during the day and high amounts at night beginning a few hours before we normally fall asleep. The actions of the circadian rhythm promote wakefulness in the late afternoon and evening. As melatonin rises later in the evening it helps to decrease mental arousal, allowing us to fall asleep at our normal bedtime. 

Some factors can decrease melatonin production, like the light from electronic screens used in the evening (the blue light tricks the brain into thinking it’s daytime and thus reduces melatonin secretion, making it harder to fall asleep at night). Avoiding bright lights in the evening might allow our own melatonin to be released earlier to help us fall asleep faster.

Some people do find it easier to fall asleep when they take a melatonin dietary supplement within an hour or two of their planned bedtime. While it may help with difficulty falling asleep, melatonin may be recommended for short-term sleeping problems, like jet lag, time changes, or shift-work disorder. Pediatricians may occasionally recommend it for certain sleep disorders in children. Taking melatonin can reduce sleep onset latency (or the time it takes from being fully awake to sleeping), increase total sleep time, and improve sleep quality. The side effects of taking melatonin for sleep can include headaches, nightmares, daytime sleepiness, dizziness, stomach cramps, and irritability. Recent research also suggests that melatonin can have a negative impact on how we metabolize food, so it should be taken at least two hours following our last meal of the day.

 

Valerian Root

Valerian root is an herb that has been used for centuries to promote relaxation and drowsiness. It contains valerenic acid, isovaleric acid, and a variety of antioxidants, all of which may promote sleep and reduce anxiety.

Researchers believe valerian root works by interacting with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin. Low GABA levels have been connected to anxiety and low-quality sleep; valeric acid impedes the breakdown of GABA in the brain, leading to feelings of serenity. Side effects of valerian root are uncommon, and research has found no connection between taking valerian root and decreased alertness the next day.

 

Other Dietary Supplement Sleep Aids

In addition to melatonin and valerian root, many other ingredients may be included in dietary supplement sleep aids. Some products have a single ingredient, but often the sleep aids have many substances, such as magnesium, chamomile, hops, lavender, skullcap, passionflower, tryptophan, L-theanine, and glycine. Some of these are traditional remedies and others have some theoretical support for their use. 

 

Safety of Dietary Supplement Sleep Aids

While research on the possible side effects of supplement sleep aids is limited, fortunately most are considered to be safe in the recommended doses. One possible exception is kava, for which there have been warnings about potential liver damage. 

Contact: Stephanie Corkett
703-243-1753
scorkett@thensf.org

National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Relationship Between Bedtime Media Use and Adolescent Sleep Health and Attentional Issues

 

Washington, D.C. (May 25, 2021): Latest research findings published in the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep Health Journal provide additional evidence of the negative effects of bedtime media use on adolescents, including the degradation of subsequent sleep and issues with attentional control during the day. Researchers also found that short sleep and daytime sleepiness increased bedtime media use.

 

Bedtime Media Use and Sleep: Evidence for Bidirectional Effects and Associations with Attention Control in Adolescents (Leonard, Khurana, and Hammond) analyzed longitudinal data collected six months apart from middle-school students in the Pacific Northwest to test bidirectional pathways between bedtime media use and sleep variables (time in bed, sleep onset latency, and daytime sleepiness). The researchers also evaluated whether sleep variables and rates of bedtime media use were associated with participants’ attention control difficulties.

 

“We found that adolescents who used screen media in the hour before going to sleep had lower sleep quantity and sleep quality, due to less time in bed and more difficulty falling asleep, which in turn was associated with greater daytime sleepiness,” said Heather Leonard, MEd. “Additionally, adolescents who reported less time in bed and more daytime sleepiness reported greater bedtime media use over time. These bidirectional associations between bedtime media use and sleep problems create a vicious cycle that promotes more bedtime media use with adverse effects on sleep and attentional focus,” added Leonard.

 

“Use of interactive screen-based devices before or in bed are consistently associated with delayed sleep onset and shorter sleep duration. The National Sleep Foundation recommends turning off electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime,” said Dr. Lauren Hale, Vice Chair of the National Sleep Foundation and Professor at Stony Brook University.

 

For more information about sleep health, visit Sleep Health Topics

 

About the National Sleep Foundation

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990, the NSF is committed to advancing excellence in sleep health theory, research and practice.
theNSF.orgSleepHealthJournal.org